Belize

Belize Travel Guide

Run by a nonprofit group promoting contemporary Central American and Caribbean artists, this shop features an impressive range of work, from quirky wire-and-masking-tape sculptures to large-format fine-art photographs.

The hand-cranked drawbridge across Haul Over Creek, known as Swing Bridge, is the unofficial center of town.

The sanctuary is home to 1,000 black howler monkeys (known here as baboons), a large tree-dwelling species that is endangered in Belize.

The improbable location—a fenced-off riverside lot, across from a power plant—is a downside worth overlooking at this swish sports bar–style spot.

With its wicker armchairs, hanging vines, and vintage botanical prints, the Radisson Fort George Hotel's cocktail bar has a colonial-chic vibe. There's live music every night, along with inventive cocktails made from ingredients such as cucumber, honey, and coconut cream.

This small, trim shop has a no-nonsense atmosphere: two desks, four humidors, and one smoking chair, which keeps the focus squarely on cigars. Many of the offerings—Bolivars, Cohibas—are from Cuba, so you'll have to light up before disembarking in the United States.

Small but jam-packed, the excellent museum has a native butterfly collection, historic photographs, and rare Mayan artifacts, such as geometric-patterned vessels, stone earplugs, and a detailed replica of a 10-pound carved jade head—the largest such object ever discovered.

Years as agent: 14. Other specialties: Costa Rica, Guatemala. Consulting fee: Varies. katien@travelpoints.com

Reggae music blares from the speakers outside this tiny store; inside there's an assortment of Caribbean-music CDs. Look for Belize-based label Stonetree
Records, which specializes in homegrown genres such as accordion-centric brukdown
and infectious punta rock.

Wander the streets of Fort George, a residential neighborhood of clapboard houses on stilts and yards lush with banana trees and bougainvillea. Look for the giant wooden barrels behind the buildings, relics of a time when rainwater was fastidiously collected for household use.