Beijing

Restaurants in Beijing

You won’t have to look far to find great restaurants in Beijing. Plenty of internationally known spots carry fusion or European inspired dishes.
The city is famous for Peking Roast Duck, a specialty at many Beijing restaurants. There is often street food sold from carts (to try with discretion) that open early and late for breakfast and late-night meals. Zuǒ Lín Yòu Shè focuses specifically on Beijing cuisine, serving up classic like dumplings to the unique deep fried pork balls. It’s easily accessible, right in the heart of the city.

Lìqún Roast Duck Restaurant is further off the beaten path, found amidst surviving hutong, or alleyways, with a courtyard setting. Despite the appearance and hard-to-find location, the place serves the best Peking duck around. Xiānhè Lóu has barbecue ribs and savory pork that is wrapped up in the typical Chinese “pancake.” Try Yáng Fāng Lamb Hotpot for the spicy and mild version of the regional classic hotpot. (Come prepared, since little English is spoken here) Zhāng Māma is a Sichuanese gem near Houhai Lake, serving the typical fiery dishes with delicious broths of Restaurants in Beijing.

Qi

When counting in Chinese, “qi” means “seven,” and this intimate restaurant offers fare from seven provinces, including Sichuan. The small space on the second floor of the Ritz-Carlton Financial Street in the Chaoyang district has seven private rooms of varying sizes.

There’s nothing better than fresh fruit on a plane. Stop at this clean kiosk—which sells fruit by weight or prepackaged—for mangoes, dragon fruit, green apples, and more.

Central Asians and Uighurs, a Muslim ethnic minority of northwest China, convene here for large helpings of big-plate chicken.

Set right on the eastern edge of the Forbidden City, this restaurant is appropriately imperial in theme.

Famed Chinese author Lu Xun wrote a short story about a student/vagrant named Kong Jiyi whose love of the bottle kept him from earning his degree.

This small shop was originally intended to sell handmade crafts, but the owner found so many people stopping in looking for coffee that he decided to make it a coffee shop.

Here, the plump bird is presented in heated rosewood boxes in an intimate dining room.

To a college student, “hot pot” might mean its ramen night again. But in Asia, it takes on an entirely different meaning: Ding Ding Xiang restaurant in the  Dongcheng neighborhood is marked by a “Hotpot Paradise" sign and serves Mongolian-style fondue.

Despite the Gallic name, this restaurant is unmistakably and indelibly Chinese—from its courtyard-style entryway to its menu of fine, time-tested Cantonese cuisine.

This venue is closed.

Daniel Boulud’s French-American outpost with a Beijing twist housed in the former U.S. Embassy. The goose egg en cocotte with smoked potato and chorizo is a surefire way to refuel for brunch.

The story goes like this: three painters from Guizhou, a poor south central province, came to Beijing seeking to earn a fortune with their brushes. They soon realized their Sichuan fare could fill a void in the city, and Three Guizhou Men was born.