Beijing

Restaurants in Beijing

You won’t have to look far to find great restaurants in Beijing. Plenty of internationally known spots carry fusion or European inspired dishes.
The city is famous for Peking Roast Duck, a specialty at many Beijing restaurants. There is often street food sold from carts (to try with discretion) that open early and late for breakfast and late-night meals. Zuǒ Lín Yòu Shè focuses specifically on Beijing cuisine, serving up classic like dumplings to the unique deep fried pork balls. It’s easily accessible, right in the heart of the city.

Lìqún Roast Duck Restaurant is further off the beaten path, found amidst surviving hutong, or alleyways, with a courtyard setting. Despite the appearance and hard-to-find location, the place serves the best Peking duck around. Xiānhè Lóu has barbecue ribs and savory pork that is wrapped up in the typical Chinese “pancake.” Try Yáng Fāng Lamb Hotpot for the spicy and mild version of the regional classic hotpot. (Come prepared, since little English is spoken here) Zhāng Māma is a Sichuanese gem near Houhai Lake, serving the typical fiery dishes with delicious broths of Restaurants in Beijing.

The menu at Source changes every two weeks, but it can be relied on for one thing: tongue-numbing Sichuan fare. Housed in the former home of a Qing general, this quiet Dongcheng restaurant has a lush courtyard that is home to date trees and a famously old pomegranate tree.

With its burnished red tables, hanging lanterns, converted-cyclo chairs, and silk-clad waitresses, Nuage is a little slice of old Saigon in downtown Beijing.

“Father of the Nation” Sun Yat-Sen was a member of the “Hakka” people, migratory Han Chinese who speak their own language and maintain their own, unique cultural traditions. Visit this Dongcheng neighborhood restaurant to taste their traditional approach to food.

Wake up with coffee and green tea ice cream! Starbucks’s comfy booths and free Wi-Fi are welcome before a long flight. Buy a Starbucks-branded Great Wall mug ($13) and a grande cappuccino ($4), or stop next door at Häagen-Dazs for a small cone ($4).

The most fabulous of the restaurants in the sprawling China World Hotel, Aria attracts a hip, well-dressed, and largely Western-expat crowd.

With an interior modeled after that of an historic Beijing courtyard home, this Cantonese restaurant offers one of the city’s most elegant dining experiences.

Qi

When counting in Chinese, “qi” means “seven,” and this intimate restaurant offers fare from seven provinces, including Sichuan. The small space on the second floor of the Ritz-Carlton Financial Street in the Chaoyang district has seven private rooms of varying sizes.

There’s nothing better than fresh fruit on a plane. Stop at this clean kiosk—which sells fruit by weight or prepackaged—for mangoes, dragon fruit, green apples, and more.

Despite the Gallic name, this restaurant is unmistakably and indelibly Chinese—from its courtyard-style entryway to its menu of fine, time-tested Cantonese cuisine.

If you must eat a meal before you get on the plane, choose carefully as the Beijing Airport’s options are middling at best. Prik Thai is the top Asian choice. Sit and look out over the ticketing hall next to a faux gold–topped Wat temple set among potted palms and silk-shaded lamps.

A real slice of old Beijing, this atmospheric restaurant is set along one of the city’s quickly disappearing hutongs.
The place is perpetually loaded with locals, foreign businessmen, and
well-informed tourists, who come in spite of (or, perhaps, because of)