Beijing

Restaurants in Beijing

You won’t have to look far to find great restaurants in Beijing. Plenty of internationally known spots carry fusion or European inspired dishes.
The city is famous for Peking Roast Duck, a specialty at many Beijing restaurants. There is often street food sold from carts (to try with discretion) that open early and late for breakfast and late-night meals. Zuǒ Lín Yòu Shè focuses specifically on Beijing cuisine, serving up classic like dumplings to the unique deep fried pork balls. It’s easily accessible, right in the heart of the city.

Lìqún Roast Duck Restaurant is further off the beaten path, found amidst surviving hutong, or alleyways, with a courtyard setting. Despite the appearance and hard-to-find location, the place serves the best Peking duck around. Xiānhè Lóu has barbecue ribs and savory pork that is wrapped up in the typical Chinese “pancake.” Try Yáng Fāng Lamb Hotpot for the spicy and mild version of the regional classic hotpot. (Come prepared, since little English is spoken here) Zhāng Māma is a Sichuanese gem near Houhai Lake, serving the typical fiery dishes with delicious broths of Restaurants in Beijing.

While in the big city, some feed the ducks, while others like to feed on the ducks. Those in the latter persuasion need look no further than this Chaoyang district restaurant.

For an authentic Peking Duck experience, locals swear by Dadong, just a 10-minute walk from Chaoyang Park Beach. After a complex process of inflating and drying their skins, the birds are roasted in fruitwood-fueled brick ovens.

As the name implies, it’s all about the roast Peking duck at this Chongwen district restaurant. The Quan Ju De brand (government-affiliated) began in 1864, and now has many locations across China.

The convivial atmosphere and tender duck pancakes make it one of the top places to try Beijing's most famous dish, peking duck.

Some say this restaurant in the Grand Hyatt rests atop Beijing’s food pyramid. Made in China's ground-floor Dongcheng neighborhood location focuses on northern Chinese fare. Wood, steel, and an open kitchen behind glass set the atmosphere inside this 126-seat glitzy space.

Central Asians and Uighurs, a Muslim ethnic minority of northwest China, convene here for large helpings of big-plate chicken.

Set right on the eastern edge of the Forbidden City, this restaurant is appropriately imperial in theme.

This small shop was originally intended to sell handmade crafts, but the owner found so many people stopping in looking for coffee that he decided to make it a coffee shop.

Here, the plump bird is presented in heated rosewood boxes in an intimate dining room.

This venue is closed.

Wheat buns toasted on a griddle and filled with braised pork are served from a take-out window at this popular restaurant. The restaurant is decorated with colorful toys and short-legged tables, making it a good option for families.

“Upscale with a kick” is one way to describe this Dongzhimenwai neighborhood restaurant, which opened in 2003 and is one of many locations throughout China.

Qu Nar Restaurant (the name means "Where are you going?" in Mandarin) is well hidden down an alley off a main Beijing road: It looks like a bunker on the outside, but the unremarkable interior includes projected art by the owner, Ai Weiwei (the artist who designed the Bird’s Nest stadium for the

On Beijing's oldest commercial street, established China restaurateur Michelle Garnaut draws the city's glitterati with seasonal, locally sourced dishes such as wild-mushroom-and-truffle risotto.