Restaurants in Beijing

Qu Nar Restaurant (the name means "Where are you going?" in Mandarin) is well hidden down an alley off a main Beijing road: It looks like a bunker on the outside, but the unremarkable interior includes projected art by the owner, Ai Weiwei (the artist who designed the Bird’s Nest stadium for the

On Beijing's oldest commercial street, established China restaurateur Michelle Garnaut draws the city's glitterati with seasonal, locally sourced dishes such as wild-mushroom-and-truffle risotto.

This high-design hot spot in a converted siheyuan (courtyard home) is the latest offering from chef Jereme Leung—already well known in Shanghai for taking traditional cuisine and turning it on its head.

Perched atop the 66th floor of the Park Hyatt hotel, China Grill provides diners an unparalleled vantage point of the city that includes views of the CCTV Tower, World Trade Center, and Changan Avenue.

Chinese artist Fang Lijun dips his brush into both the culinary and visual arts, and this Lotus Lane restaurant is an example of his work as a restaurateur. While Fang’s visual art is harshly real, the Hunan food at this Lotus Lane restaurant is far from it.


Treat yourself to an over-the-top dinner at the Philippe Starck-designed LAN, full of Baroque accents and crowd-pleasing dishes (oysters in spicy-sauce; stir-fried lobster).

The menu at Source changes every two weeks, but it can be relied on for one thing: tongue-numbing Sichuan fare. Housed in the former home of a Qing general, this quiet Dongcheng restaurant has a lush courtyard that is home to date trees and a famously old pomegranate tree.

Newbies are easily spotted when it comes to xiaolong bao buns: Just look for the telltale shirt stains from the soup-filled dumplings, which tend to explode when bitten into.

"This is a 24-hours restaurant that serves Cantonese cuisine, mainly in small dim sum portions. It's a great place for people-watching, too. The shrimp dumplings, stewed beef with radish, and spare ribs with black bean sauce are some of my favorites.

“Fine cuisine” is not usually the first thing that pops to mind when talking about the government. In this case though, the Sichuan provincial office hosts a restaurant, highlighting the fiery spice of Sichuan fare. Each province is represented by an official restaurant in Beijing.

This venue is closed.

With its burnished red tables, hanging lanterns, converted-cyclo chairs, and silk-clad waitresses, Nuage is a little slice of old Saigon in downtown Beijing.

While in the big city, some feed the ducks, while others like to feed on the ducks. Those in the latter persuasion need look no further than this Chaoyang district restaurant.