Beijing

Restaurants in Beijing

The menu at Source changes every two weeks, but it can be relied on for one thing: tongue-numbing Sichuan fare. Housed in the former home of a Qing general, this quiet Dongcheng restaurant has a lush courtyard that is home to date trees and a famously old pomegranate tree.

Newbies are easily spotted when it comes to xiaolong bao buns: Just look for the telltale shirt stains from the soup-filled dumplings, which tend to explode when bitten into.

"This is a 24-hours restaurant that serves Cantonese cuisine, mainly in small dim sum portions. It's a great place for people-watching, too. The shrimp dumplings, stewed beef with radish, and spare ribs with black bean sauce are some of my favorites.

“Fine cuisine” is not usually the first thing that pops to mind when talking about the government. In this case though, the Sichuan provincial office hosts a restaurant, highlighting the fiery spice of Sichuan fare. Each province is represented by an official restaurant in Beijing.

This venue is closed.

With its burnished red tables, hanging lanterns, converted-cyclo chairs, and silk-clad waitresses, Nuage is a little slice of old Saigon in downtown Beijing.

While in the big city, some feed the ducks, while others like to feed on the ducks. Those in the latter persuasion need look no further than this Chaoyang district restaurant.

Graffiti art covers the walls of Ireland-born chef Brian McKenna's 2010-opened restaurant/lounge, which turns out whimsical, Chinese-inflected creations (chicken wontons with avocado-and-lime dip; raspberry-and-herb-infused chocolate pop tarts).

Designed by a New Yorker, this edgy lounge and restaurant is definitely not for the whole family. Bold canvases, antique opium beds, and polished concrete set a trendy yet chill atmosphere inside this alley location in an old siheyuan, or multi-building house with a central courtyard.

“Father of the Nation” Sun Yat-Sen was a member of the “Hakka” people, migratory Han Chinese who speak their own language and maintain their own, unique cultural traditions. Visit this Dongcheng neighborhood restaurant to taste their traditional approach to food.

Wake up with coffee and green tea ice cream! Starbucks’s comfy booths and free Wi-Fi are welcome before a long flight. Buy a Starbucks-branded Great Wall mug ($13) and a grande cappuccino ($4), or stop next door at Häagen-Dazs for a small cone ($4).

For an authentic Peking Duck experience, locals swear by Dadong, just a 10-minute walk from Chaoyang Park Beach. After a complex process of inflating and drying their skins, the birds are roasted in fruitwood-fueled brick ovens.

As the name implies, it’s all about the roast Peking duck at this Chongwen district restaurant. The Quan Ju De brand (government-affiliated) began in 1864, and now has many locations across China.