Beijing

Restaurants in Beijing

You won’t have to look far to find great restaurants in Beijing. Plenty of internationally known spots carry fusion or European inspired dishes.
The city is famous for Peking Roast Duck, a specialty at many Beijing restaurants. There is often street food sold from carts (to try with discretion) that open early and late for breakfast and late-night meals. Zuǒ Lín Yòu Shè focuses specifically on Beijing cuisine, serving up classic like dumplings to the unique deep fried pork balls. It’s easily accessible, right in the heart of the city.

Lìqún Roast Duck Restaurant is further off the beaten path, found amidst surviving hutong, or alleyways, with a courtyard setting. Despite the appearance and hard-to-find location, the place serves the best Peking duck around. Xiānhè Lóu has barbecue ribs and savory pork that is wrapped up in the typical Chinese “pancake.” Try Yáng Fāng Lamb Hotpot for the spicy and mild version of the regional classic hotpot. (Come prepared, since little English is spoken here) Zhāng Māma is a Sichuanese gem near Houhai Lake, serving the typical fiery dishes with delicious broths of Restaurants in Beijing.

A real slice of old Beijing, this atmospheric restaurant is set along one of the city’s quickly disappearing hutongs.
The place is perpetually loaded with locals, foreign businessmen, and
well-informed tourists, who come in spite of (or, perhaps, because of)

If you must eat a meal before you get on the plane, choose carefully as the Beijing Airport’s options are middling at best. Prik Thai is the top Asian choice. Sit and look out over the ticketing hall next to a faux gold–topped Wat temple set among potted palms and silk-shaded lamps.

“Upscale with a kick” is one way to describe this Dongzhimenwai neighborhood restaurant, which opened in 2003 and is one of many locations throughout China.

Wheat buns toasted on a griddle and filled with braised pork are served from a take-out window at this popular restaurant. The restaurant is decorated with colorful toys and short-legged tables, making it a good option for families.

Irish-born chef Brian McKenna was something of a Continental wunderkind—by his early 20s, he’d already worked in several Michelin-starred European kitchens—before he brought his super-creative cuisine to Beijing in 2007.

Don’t expect a traditional “t” house at this Chaoyang district restaurant; it defies categorization.

RBL

Qu Nar Restaurant (the name means "Where are you going?" in Mandarin) is well hidden down an alley off a main Beijing road: It looks like a bunker on the outside, but the unremarkable interior includes projected art by the owner, Ai Weiwei (the artist who designed the Bird’s Nest stadium for the

On Beijing's oldest commercial street, established China restaurateur Michelle Garnaut draws the city's glitterati with seasonal, locally sourced dishes such as wild-mushroom-and-truffle risotto.

This high-design hot spot in a converted siheyuan (courtyard home) is the latest offering from chef Jereme Leung—already well known in Shanghai for taking traditional cuisine and turning it on its head.

Perched atop the 66th floor of the Park Hyatt hotel, China Grill provides diners an unparalleled vantage point of the city that includes views of the CCTV Tower, World Trade Center, and Changan Avenue.

Chinese artist Fang Lijun dips his brush into both the culinary and visual arts, and this Lotus Lane restaurant is an example of his work as a restaurateur. While Fang’s visual art is harshly real, the Hunan food at this Lotus Lane restaurant is far from it.

LAN

Treat yourself to an over-the-top dinner at the Philippe Starck-designed LAN, full of Baroque accents and crowd-pleasing dishes (oysters in spicy-sauce; stir-fried lobster).

The menu at Source changes every two weeks, but it can be relied on for one thing: tongue-numbing Sichuan fare. Housed in the former home of a Qing general, this quiet Dongcheng restaurant has a lush courtyard that is home to date trees and a famously old pomegranate tree.