Beijing

Restaurants in Beijing

You won’t have to look far to find great restaurants in Beijing. Plenty of internationally known spots carry fusion or European inspired dishes.
The city is famous for Peking Roast Duck, a specialty at many Beijing restaurants. There is often street food sold from carts (to try with discretion) that open early and late for breakfast and late-night meals. Zuǒ Lín Yòu Shè focuses specifically on Beijing cuisine, serving up classic like dumplings to the unique deep fried pork balls. It’s easily accessible, right in the heart of the city.

Lìqún Roast Duck Restaurant is further off the beaten path, found amidst surviving hutong, or alleyways, with a courtyard setting. Despite the appearance and hard-to-find location, the place serves the best Peking duck around. Xiānhè Lóu has barbecue ribs and savory pork that is wrapped up in the typical Chinese “pancake.” Try Yáng Fāng Lamb Hotpot for the spicy and mild version of the regional classic hotpot. (Come prepared, since little English is spoken here) Zhāng Māma is a Sichuanese gem near Houhai Lake, serving the typical fiery dishes with delicious broths of Restaurants in Beijing.

“Fine cuisine” is not usually the first thing that pops to mind when talking about the government. In this case though, the Sichuan provincial office hosts a restaurant, highlighting the fiery spice of Sichuan fare. Each province is represented by an official restaurant in Beijing.

This venue is closed.

With its burnished red tables, hanging lanterns, converted-cyclo chairs, and silk-clad waitresses, Nuage is a little slice of old Saigon in downtown Beijing.

While in the big city, some feed the ducks, while others like to feed on the ducks. Those in the latter persuasion need look no further than this Chaoyang district restaurant.

Designed by a New Yorker, this edgy lounge and restaurant is definitely not for the whole family. Bold canvases, antique opium beds, and polished concrete set a trendy yet chill atmosphere inside this alley location in an old siheyuan, or multi-building house with a central courtyard.

Graffiti art covers the walls of Ireland-born chef Brian McKenna's 2010-opened restaurant/lounge, which turns out whimsical, Chinese-inflected creations (chicken wontons with avocado-and-lime dip; raspberry-and-herb-infused chocolate pop tarts).

“Father of the Nation” Sun Yat-Sen was a member of the “Hakka” people, migratory Han Chinese who speak their own language and maintain their own, unique cultural traditions. Visit this Dongcheng neighborhood restaurant to taste their traditional approach to food.

Wake up with coffee and green tea ice cream! Starbucks’s comfy booths and free Wi-Fi are welcome before a long flight. Buy a Starbucks-branded Great Wall mug ($13) and a grande cappuccino ($4), or stop next door at Häagen-Dazs for a small cone ($4).

For an authentic Peking Duck experience, locals swear by Dadong, just a 10-minute walk from Chaoyang Park Beach. After a complex process of inflating and drying their skins, the birds are roasted in fruitwood-fueled brick ovens.

As the name implies, it’s all about the roast Peking duck at this Chongwen district restaurant. The Quan Ju De brand (government-affiliated) began in 1864, and now has many locations across China.

The most fabulous of the restaurants in the sprawling China World Hotel, Aria attracts a hip, well-dressed, and largely Western-expat crowd.

The convivial atmosphere and tender duck pancakes make it one of the top places to try Beijing's most famous dish, peking duck.