Restaurants in Beijing

Near the Forbidden City, this restored siheyuan (multi-building structure surrounding a courtyard) is home to one of American lawyer Handel Lee’s creations. Opened in 1997, this dinner-only restaurant specializes in its own brand of fusion, although dishes are mainly Asian or Western.

Reservations are essential here where a traditional 10-dish menu highlights classic regional ingredients (sea cucumber, abalone) in a 700-year-old former Buddhist temple.


When counting in Chinese, “qi” means “seven,” and this intimate restaurant offers fare from seven provinces, including Sichuan. The small space on the second floor of the Ritz-Carlton Financial Street in the Chaoyang district has seven private rooms of varying sizes.

There’s nothing better than fresh fruit on a plane. Stop at this clean kiosk—which sells fruit by weight or prepackaged—for mangoes, dragon fruit, green apples, and more.

Central Asians and Uighurs, a Muslim ethnic minority of northwest China, convene here for large helpings of big-plate chicken.

Set right on the eastern edge of the Forbidden City, this restaurant is appropriately imperial in theme.

Famed Chinese author Lu Xun wrote a short story about a student/vagrant named Kong Jiyi whose love of the bottle kept him from earning his degree.

This small shop was originally intended to sell handmade crafts, but the owner found so many people stopping in looking for coffee that he decided to make it a coffee shop.

Here, the plump bird is presented in heated rosewood boxes in an intimate dining room.

To a college student, “hot pot” might mean its ramen night again. But in Asia, it takes on an entirely different meaning: Ding Ding Xiang restaurant in the  Dongcheng neighborhood is marked by a “Hotpot Paradise" sign and serves Mongolian-style fondue.

Despite the Gallic name, this restaurant is unmistakably and indelibly Chinese—from its courtyard-style entryway to its menu of fine, time-tested Cantonese cuisine.

This venue is closed.