Beijing

Restaurants in Beijing

“Father of the Nation” Sun Yat-Sen was a member of the “Hakka” people, migratory Han Chinese who speak their own language and maintain their own, unique cultural traditions. Visit this Dongcheng neighborhood restaurant to taste their traditional approach to food.

Wake up with coffee and green tea ice cream! Starbucks’s comfy booths and free Wi-Fi are welcome before a long flight. Buy a Starbucks-branded Great Wall mug ($13) and a grande cappuccino ($4), or stop next door at Häagen-Dazs for a small cone ($4).

As the name implies, it’s all about the roast Peking duck at this Chongwen district restaurant. The Quan Ju De brand (government-affiliated) began in 1864, and now has many locations across China.

For an authentic Peking Duck experience, locals swear by Dadong, just a 10-minute walk from Chaoyang Park Beach. After a complex process of inflating and drying their skins, the birds are roasted in fruitwood-fueled brick ovens.

The most fabulous of the restaurants in the sprawling China World Hotel, Aria attracts a hip, well-dressed, and largely Western-expat crowd.

The convivial atmosphere and tender duck pancakes make it one of the top places to try Beijing's most famous dish, peking duck.

Hidden among the back alleys of Beijing and within the Dongcheng neighborhood, the Dali Courtyard offers a quaint outdoor setting and authentic Yunnanese cuisine. Food from the southern province of Yunnan utilizes the herbs of the region, as well as the mushrooms it’s known for.

This Mongolian hotpot restaurant takes open kitchen to the whole new level, putting the diners in charge of adding ingredients to the simmering pot at table side.

With an interior modeled after that of an historic Beijing courtyard home, this Cantonese restaurant offers one of the city’s most elegant dining experiences.

Some say this restaurant in the Grand Hyatt rests atop Beijing’s food pyramid. Made in China's ground-floor Dongcheng neighborhood location focuses on northern Chinese fare. Wood, steel, and an open kitchen behind glass set the atmosphere inside this 126-seat glitzy space.

Near the Forbidden City, this restored siheyuan (multi-building structure surrounding a courtyard) is home to one of American lawyer Handel Lee’s creations. Opened in 1997, this dinner-only restaurant specializes in its own brand of fusion, although dishes are mainly Asian or Western.

Reservations are essential here where a traditional 10-dish menu highlights classic regional ingredients (sea cucumber, abalone) in a 700-year-old former Buddhist temple.