Beijing

Restaurants in Beijing

This small shop was originally intended to sell handmade crafts, but the owner found so many people stopping in looking for coffee that he decided to make it a coffee shop.

Here, the plump bird is presented in heated rosewood boxes in an intimate dining room.

To a college student, “hot pot” might mean its ramen night again. But in Asia, it takes on an entirely different meaning: Ding Ding Xiang restaurant in the  Dongcheng neighborhood is marked by a “Hotpot Paradise" sign and serves Mongolian-style fondue.

Despite the Gallic name, this restaurant is unmistakably and indelibly Chinese—from its courtyard-style entryway to its menu of fine, time-tested Cantonese cuisine.

This venue is closed.

Daniel Boulud’s French-American outpost with a Beijing twist housed in the former U.S. Embassy. The goose egg en cocotte with smoked potato and chorizo is a surefire way to refuel for brunch.

The story goes like this: three painters from Guizhou, a poor south central province, came to Beijing seeking to earn a fortune with their brushes. They soon realized their Sichuan fare could fill a void in the city, and Three Guizhou Men was born.

A real slice of old Beijing, this atmospheric restaurant is set along one of the city’s quickly disappearing hutongs.
The place is perpetually loaded with locals, foreign businessmen, and
well-informed tourists, who come in spite of (or, perhaps, because of)

If you must eat a meal before you get on the plane, choose carefully as the Beijing Airport’s options are middling at best. Prik Thai is the top Asian choice. Sit and look out over the ticketing hall next to a faux gold–topped Wat temple set among potted palms and silk-shaded lamps.

Wheat buns toasted on a griddle and filled with braised pork are served from a take-out window at this popular restaurant. The restaurant is decorated with colorful toys and short-legged tables, making it a good option for families.

“Upscale with a kick” is one way to describe this Dongzhimenwai neighborhood restaurant, which opened in 2003 and is one of many locations throughout China.

Irish-born chef Brian McKenna was something of a Continental wunderkind—by his early 20s, he’d already worked in several Michelin-starred European kitchens—before he brought his super-creative cuisine to Beijing in 2007.