Beijing

Hotels in Beijing

Beijing’s hotels are largely luxury or boutique format, with massive high-rise accommodations or small-scale courtyard spots. Grand Hotel Beijing certainly has the appearance to match its title. Its ancient and artful design reflects the hotel’s view, which is over the Forbidden City itself. It is just steps away from Tiananmen Square and offers modern luxuries with an indoor pool and gourmet cuisine at restaurants on-site. The Regent Bejing is one of the best hotels in Beijing and offers 500 rooms with five-star facilities and accommodations. The hotel is less than a mile from the Forbidden City and right along the central shopping street.

Hotel Kunlun is located in Beijing’s Central Business District (CBD) and overlooks the scene Liangma River. The restaurants in the hotel serve Sichuan cuisine, as well as Vietnamese, Thai, Korean and Japanese. Radegast Lake View Hotel Beijing has elegant rooms with floor-to-ceiling windows offering views of the city or Longtan Lake. It’s also only a 10-minute drive from the Temple of Heaven, a historical site that is worth the trip.

Inspired by China’s imperial palaces (lacquered red pillars; gold bamboo panels; crystal chandeliers), with escalator access to one of the city’s most upscale shopping malls. 

The first boutique hotel in Beijing's edgy 798 Art District, an enclave of galleries in former factory buildings. Work by notable locals such as photographer Chi Peng is on view in the 30 gray-walled guest rooms.

The opulence that greeted guests when the Pen opened more than two decades ago—the sweeping Busby Berkeley–style marble staircase and luxury boutiques—still exists, but a 2004 renovation brought a sleek modernity to all 525 of its rooms.

One of the Ritz-Carlton’s new-look hotels, this funky, modern Financial Street outpost bears no traces of the chain’s signature country-estate grandeur.

The capital’s boutique hotel scene gets a boost with the 99-room Opposite House, in the burgeoning Sanlitun area; it’s the first property from the recently formed Swire Hotels group. The rooms in this emerald cube have deep wooden soaking tubs.

Three-year-old hotel with a soaring lobby atrium, 20 minutes by car from the airport—closer than most.

A short stroll from the Forbidden City, the Emperor is a contemporary homage to its 600-year-old neighbor. Designs on the suede walls and etched-glass bathrooms echo the sloped-roof silhouettes of the Imperial Palace, and the rooftop Yin bar has impressive views of the royal grounds.

This enormous, curved glass tower just a stone’s throw from the shops of Wangfujing has a lot going for it: super-solicitous service; excellent in-house dining and entertainment; and the most outrageously over-the-top indoor “urban resort” in the city—the 4,921-square-foot Club Oasis, where a vas

24-story building on well-manicured grounds. The Chi spa offers treatments from Thailand, Tibet, and China.

The eagerly anticipated Mandarin Oriental, Beijing, in a dramatically angled tower within the Rem Koolhaas and Ole Scheeren–designed CCTV complex, is slated for completion in 2008.

372 spacious, wood-accented rooms. Tech amenities include smart phones with free instant messaging and a lobby bar filled with Macs and PC's.

Amanresorts’ first foray into China is a cocoon of quiet sophistication near the heart of the frenzied capital.

The charming hotel is located in a small hutong near the Jiugulou subway stop.

Muted spa-like rooms (blond-wood furniture; white leather sofas) atop a 66-story skyscraper—the tallest on Chang’an Avenue.