Barcelona

Things to do in Barcelona

At the center of Barcelona’s old city lies the Gothic Quarter, a maze of narrow medieval streets packed with intriguing shops and cafés surrounding the Cathedral de la Seu, which is composed of Roman ruins and Gothic structures. Architecture buffs can’t miss Antoni Gaudí’s modernist structures, like Casa Batlló, La Pedrera, Park Güell, and his masterpiece, the still-unfinished Sagrada Familia. Gaudí’s genius is represented in every imposing structure and whimsical detail of his constructions.
A walk down La Rambla is an unparalleled way to absorb the city’s energy. This tree-lined pedestrian street starts near Plaça de Catalunya and ends at Rambla de Mar, by the water. Find newsstands, souvenir kiosks, street performers and sidewalk cafés along La Rambla, and stop at La Boquería, a magnificent food market, for a bite to eat.
Head to Plaça d’Espanya, a grand square built the 1929 International Exhibition, to be welcomed by the Venetian Towers. Nearby, the Font Mágica de Montjuïc provides a beautiful spectacle of dancing fountains, lights and music in the evenings with the Palau Nacional in the background. For soccer fans, taking a tour of Camp Nou, home of Barcelona FC, is a must. You’ll never run out of things to do in Barcelona.

Design aficionados will appreciate the two-storied Vinçon. It carries furniture and decorative objects for every room—except the bedroom; that's around the corner at spin-off shop Tinçon.

Stock up on buttery bread loaves studded with dried fruits and nuts.

The hillside neighborhood of Pedralbes, in northwestern Barcelona, is full of 19th- and early-20th-century mansions (built by textile barons and industrialists), but its crowning glory is the serene 14th-century cloister Monestir de Pedralbes.

Join the Gaudi gawkers in front of the architect's surreal Casa Batlló.

The Contemporary Culture Center of Barcelona is one of the city’s most prominent exhibition centers.

A collection of five monuments and museums that tells—and shows—the story behind Barcelona's rich history.

Contemporary art dealer Natalia Foguet has been showing the work of emerging international artists for over a decade.

Vintage jewelry in a museum-like setting.

Picnic around the saltwater swimming pool overlooking the Mediterranean.

Journey up to the Parc de Monjuïc to see the work of Picasso's Barcelona contemporaries at the Museu Nacional d'Art de Catalunya.

This 100-year-old clothing store stocks a slew of Catalán designers for women and men (including Josep Abril's impeccable linen shirts). Look for the reduced-price off-season racks in the back.

This venue is closed.