Barcelona

Barcelona Travel Guide

At the center of Barcelona’s old city lies the Gothic Quarter, a maze of narrow medieval streets packed with intriguing shops and cafés surrounding the Cathedral de la Seu, which is composed of Roman ruins and Gothic structures. Architecture buffs can’t miss Antoni Gaudí’s modernist structures, like Casa Batlló, La Pedrera, Park Güell, and his masterpiece, the still-unfinished Sagrada Familia. Gaudí’s genius is represented in every imposing structure and whimsical detail of his constructions.
A walk down La Rambla is an unparalleled way to absorb the city’s energy. This tree-lined pedestrian street starts near Plaça de Catalunya and ends at Rambla de Mar, by the water. Find newsstands, souvenir kiosks, street performers and sidewalk cafés along La Rambla, and stop at La Boquería, a magnificent food market, for a bite to eat.
Head to Plaça d’Espanya, a grand square built the 1929 International Exhibition, to be welcomed by the Venetian Towers. Nearby, the Font Mágica de Montjuïc provides a beautiful spectacle of dancing fountains, lights and music in the evenings with the Palau Nacional in the background. For soccer fans, taking a tour of Camp Nou, home of Barcelona FC, is a must. You’ll never run out of things to do in Barcelona.

Ask a sophisticated Barcelona native where he'll be this weekend, and the answer is often the Centre de Cultura Contemporània de Barcelona (CCCB).

Down a narrow stone alley in Born, near the Cathedral Santa Maria del Mar, designer Beatriz Furest's handbag store is marked only by a simple white flag bearing her name.

For one-stop shopping, Corte Ingles sells everything from maternity wear to marcona almonds. Located on the main square of Plaza Catalunya, this Spanish institution, founded in 1934, boasts nine floors of retail goods, including a supermarket, pharmacy and travel agency.

Catalonia's big art players - the Museu Nacional d'Art de Catalunya, the Fundació Joan Miró, CaixaForum, and the Mies van der Rohe Pavilion - are concentrated on Montjuïc, a small mountain overlooking the port.

Working in metals such as brushed 18-karat gold and oxidized silver, jeweler Enric Majoral creates chic, versatile pieces that can be dressed both up and down.

With more than 30 years of experience in the jewelry industry, Carmina Rotger is Barcelona’s top authority on accessories, and her shop is a go-to destination for the finest in designer baubles.

Paperam is a paper shop located in the Raval neighborhood less than a five-minute walk from La Boqueria market. The store sells a variety of colorful papers, pens, and stationary and provides photocopying and faxing services. It also houses a bookbinding workshop.

Known for his discerning eye, art and antiques dealer Albert Martğ Palau just opened a gallery of rare prints by Spain's modern and old masters, including Francisco de Goya.

To ease out of a long workday, stylish Barcelonians stop by this polished Eixample town house for Bloody Marys and tumblers of whiskey. In summer, the large terrace is also a draw.

Seize the day (or make that the night), with a typically late supper of Asian-accented Mediterranean fare followed by a spin on the busy dance floor at this cavernous disco.

There can be a long wait to get in, but it's worth it, if only to see the extensive collection of portraits by the artist when he was a young man. Chart the artist's remarkable career from early childhood through his Cubist canvases and the whimsical ceramics of his final years.

Catering to the city’s fashionable set, Muntaner 385 is an upscale men’s clothing store that stocks designer garments and accessories in an ultra-stylish, multilevel shop in the Eixample district.

What used to be the heart of the city (El Born) and the waterfront district (La Ribera) is now Born-Ribera, a haven for hip taverns, boisterous restaurants, Renaissance palaces, and cultural icons such as the Museu Picasso.

This dark and industrial bar is located on El Raval's most happening bar-lined street.