Barcelona

Barcelona Travel Guide

At the center of Barcelona’s old city lies the Gothic Quarter, a maze of narrow medieval streets packed with intriguing shops and cafés surrounding the Cathedral de la Seu, which is composed of Roman ruins and Gothic structures. Architecture buffs can’t miss Antoni Gaudí’s modernist structures, like Casa Batlló, La Pedrera, Park Güell, and his masterpiece, the still-unfinished Sagrada Familia. Gaudí’s genius is represented in every imposing structure and whimsical detail of his constructions.
A walk down La Rambla is an unparalleled way to absorb the city’s energy. This tree-lined pedestrian street starts near Plaça de Catalunya and ends at Rambla de Mar, by the water. Find newsstands, souvenir kiosks, street performers and sidewalk cafés along La Rambla, and stop at La Boquería, a magnificent food market, for a bite to eat.
Head to Plaça d’Espanya, a grand square built the 1929 International Exhibition, to be welcomed by the Venetian Towers. Nearby, the Font Mágica de Montjuïc provides a beautiful spectacle of dancing fountains, lights and music in the evenings with the Palau Nacional in the background. For soccer fans, taking a tour of Camp Nou, home of Barcelona FC, is a must. You’ll never run out of things to do in Barcelona.

A collection of five monuments and museums that tells—and shows—the story behind Barcelona's rich history.

Contemporary art dealer Natalia Foguet has been showing the work of emerging international artists for over a decade.

Vintage jewelry in a museum-like setting.

One of Spain’s oldest and largest markets, the Mercat de la Boqueria is located just off La Rambla in a cavernous, iron-framed hall.

Ancient Roman walls and Gothic palaces frame the Barri Gòtic's pedestrian streets, which are filled with antiques stores and cafés - all surrounding the central Catedral de la Seu.

Every Thursday, the Plaça de la Seu at the base of the massive 15th-century cathedral—the most famous edifice in Barcelona (not counting the Gaudís)—hosts an outdoor flea market.

This unassuming shop stocks exquisite Italian leather goods: buttery-soft black flats from Pompeii and bags from the Sicilian line Bid Hand Made.

Cereria Subirà claims to be the oldest shop in all of Barcelona, although no one can agree on when exactly it was founded, and it hasn’t always sold candles. This “waxery” (or cereria) stocks home accessories, most of which have something to do with generating light.

Since 1897, Els Quatre Gats (“The Four Cats”) has served many purposes: pub, café, hostel, cabaret, and restaurant. Located on the ground floor of a Josep Puig I Cadaflach-designed building, this space was a rumored haunt of artist Pablo Picasso.

Journey up to the Parc de Monjuïc to see the work of Picasso's Barcelona contemporaries at the Museu Nacional d'Art de Catalunya.

Picnic around the saltwater swimming pool overlooking the Mediterranean.

Enjoy a different perspective of Barcelona from the saddle of a five-speed bike with the help of Biciclot Marítim, a nonprofit bike co-operative founded in 1986.

If you're after a one-stop fiesta, you'll find it here: Six separate spaces, including an open kitchen, a dining room, a casual café, a terrace bar, and a lounge, with dancing on weekends.

The salon is staffed with multilingual, London-trained stylists.