Barcelona Travel Guide

Vintage jewelry in a museum-like setting.

A collection of five monuments and museums that tells—and shows—the story behind Barcelona's rich history.

Contemporary art dealer Natalia Foguet has been showing the work of emerging international artists for over a decade.

Ancient Roman walls and Gothic palaces frame the Barri Gòtic's pedestrian streets, which are filled with antiques stores and cafés - all surrounding the central Catedral de la Seu.

Every Thursday, the Plaça de la Seu at the base of the massive 15th-century cathedral—the most famous edifice in Barcelona (not counting the Gaudís)—hosts an outdoor flea market.

One of Spain’s oldest and largest markets, the Mercat de la Boqueria is located just off La Rambla in a cavernous, iron-framed hall.

This unassuming shop stocks exquisite Italian leather goods: buttery-soft black flats from Pompeii and bags from the Sicilian line Bid Hand Made.

Cereria Subirà claims to be the oldest shop in all of Barcelona, although no one can agree on when exactly it was founded, and it hasn’t always sold candles. This “waxery” (or cereria) stocks home accessories, most of which have something to do with generating light.

Since 1897, Els Quatre Gats (“The Four Cats”) has served many purposes: pub, café, hostel, cabaret, and restaurant. Located on the ground floor of a Josep Puig I Cadaflach-designed building, this space was a rumored haunt of artist Pablo Picasso.

Picnic around the saltwater swimming pool overlooking the Mediterranean.

Journey up to the Parc de Monjuïc to see the work of Picasso's Barcelona contemporaries at the Museu Nacional d'Art de Catalunya.

The salon is staffed with multilingual, London-trained stylists.

Flowy 1970's vintage caftans and cocktail dresses share the racks with Cucharada's own line of handmade leather bags and accessories.

Enjoy a different perspective of Barcelona from the saddle of a five-speed bike with the help of Biciclot Marítim, a nonprofit bike co-operative founded in 1986.