Barcelona

Things to do in Barcelona

At the center of Barcelona’s old city lies the Gothic Quarter, a maze of narrow medieval streets packed with intriguing shops and cafés surrounding the Cathedral de la Seu, which is composed of Roman ruins and Gothic structures. Architecture buffs can’t miss Antoni Gaudí’s modernist structures, like Casa Batlló, La Pedrera, Park Güell, and his masterpiece, the still-unfinished Sagrada Familia. Gaudí’s genius is represented in every imposing structure and whimsical detail of his constructions.
A walk down La Rambla is an unparalleled way to absorb the city’s energy. This tree-lined pedestrian street starts near Plaça de Catalunya and ends at Rambla de Mar, by the water. Find newsstands, souvenir kiosks, street performers and sidewalk cafés along La Rambla, and stop at La Boquería, a magnificent food market, for a bite to eat.
Head to Plaça d’Espanya, a grand square built the 1929 International Exhibition, to be welcomed by the Venetian Towers. Nearby, the Font Mágica de Montjuïc provides a beautiful spectacle of dancing fountains, lights and music in the evenings with the Palau Nacional in the background. For soccer fans, taking a tour of Camp Nou, home of Barcelona FC, is a must. You’ll never run out of things to do in Barcelona.

A well-curated collection of products for tots—playful floral-print suitcases; custom furniture—are hand-picked by French émigrée Murielle Bressan.

Gaudí's architectural works are scattered throughout the city. A highlight is this church, his unfinished symphony of modernist high notes.

The word naftalina translates to naphthalene, the active ingredient in mothballs. The name seems almost unfitting of this store in the Grácia neighborhood. The trendy retailer stands out from the surrounding shops with its selection of handmade, designer women’s clothing.

Catalonia's big art players - the Museu Nacional d'Art de Catalunya, the Fundació Joan Miró, CaixaForum, and the Mies van der Rohe Pavilion - are concentrated on Montjuïc, a small mountain overlooking the port.

Working in metals such as brushed 18-karat gold and oxidized silver, jeweler Enric Majoral creates chic, versatile pieces that can be dressed both up and down.

With more than 30 years of experience in the jewelry industry, Carmina Rotger is Barcelona’s top authority on accessories, and her shop is a go-to destination for the finest in designer baubles.

What used to be the heart of the city (El Born) and the waterfront district (La Ribera) is now Born-Ribera, a haven for hip taverns, boisterous restaurants, Renaissance palaces, and cultural icons such as the Museu Picasso.

This dark and industrial bar is located on El Raval's most happening bar-lined street.

The unique space at Ras, constructed from concrete and cast iron, serves a three-fold purpose: it is part exhibition space, part bookstore, and part gallery.

This colorful Grácia store was founded by husband and wife Fabian and Anna, who moved to Barcelona from Paris. Bateau Lune is committed to selling toys and items that encourage children to use their imaginations and to learn.

Set in a former basement car-repair shop, the loftlike gallery showcases cutting-edge international and Spanish artists such as local painter Miguel Macaya.

Situated near the Olympic Port, Bogatell beach provides a more laid-back environment than nearby Barceloneta beach, which is typically packed with tourists. Known as one of the city’s safest beaches, Bogatell tends to attract families and older visitors.

With its high ceilings, arches, and airy passages, this innovative building houses the world's largest collection of Miró's work plus British art, from 1945 to 1968-that is, postwar to Pop.

From slouchy, oversize carryalls to soft leather purses in the store's signature abanico (fan) shape, bags from Lupo are a Barcelona staple.

The two-floor emporium of fabulousness in El Born sells everything from music to beauty products to clothing.