Restaurants in Barcelona

Chef Francesc Gimeno Manduley’s low-cost, high-concept miniatures are a marvel of ingenuity.

Don’t bother braving the white-hot dinner scene at this 1933 landmark reopened in 2009 with local superstar Carles Abellán.

Don’t miss chefs Montse Moreno and Xavi Manero’s 14-person get-togethers. Best dish: Iberian pork confit.


Located 345 feet above ground, this Michelin one-starred restaurant is housed in a large glass dome atop the Hesperia Tower hotel, just five minutes from the airport.


The quiet dining room in L’Eixample experiments with a cuisine at the intersection of Vietnam, New Orleans, and Catalonia. The result: lamb carpaccio topped with caramelized ginger and green-apple relish, and dorado steamed in a banana leaf with coconut milk.

This venue has closed.

Since 1929, this El Born district bar has been serving tapas such as patatas bravas, fresh anchovies in vinegar, and butifarra, a Catalan sausage. The specialty of the house though is chipirónescon mongetes, a warm plate of baby squid and light beans. To accompany meals

Since 2004, the Canadian-Catalan Artal family has engineered a big success in this clean-lined, minimalist space, appealing to hip, young locals with Catalan products and original cookery, and to visitors with explanations of recipes and wines in the language of Shakespeare.

The boho café near El Born is so green that even the beer is organic. The earthy spelt bread dunks superbly into the saucy meatballs enriched with a hand-pounded almond sauce, and the fluffy brandada de bacalao is painstakingly beaten with olive oil.

Pied piper Pep Manubens has been pulling off culinary magic in this slender slot of a restaurant for the last quarter century. The formula is simple: squeeze through the door and enjoy a bottle of Albariño while you wait for some of the city’s best tapas.

Inside the tiled Barri Gòtic bodega, order fried sardines and the refreshing tomato-and-onion salad that inspired a similar dish at Inopia.

Just off Passeig de Gracia, the city’s Art Nouveau shopping street, Tapaç 24 is great for a breakfast of bocadillos (sandwiches) and cafe con leche.

A fine-dining institution since 1967, Via Veneto uses fresh ingredients from the Mediterranean coast in its authentic Catalan cuisine. Helmed by the father-and-son team of José and Pedro Monje, the restaurant's interior is elegant, with Jacquard fabrics, heavy drapery, and jewel-toned accents.

With only four tables, calling ahead is necessary for this bright tapas bar. Located near the Metro Sant Antoni stop, this spot specializes in traditional Catalonian tapas.