Barcelona

Restaurants in Barcelona

Flanked by the Pyrenees and bathed by the Mediterranean, Barcelona has an unbeatable bounty that makes it one of the prime culinary destinations in the world. Feast on high-end tapas by superstar brothers Ferran and Albert Adrià at Tickets, or seasonal fare at Carles Abellán's Michelin-starred Comerç24. Restaurants in Barcelona also boast touches of Moorish cuisine and, of course, Catalan specialties like mar i muntanya (surf 'n' turf) and crema catalana. In true Spanish style, bares de tapas are also a Barcelona staple, and one of the best ways to explore the city.
You'll want to check out a variety of Barcelona restaurants to fully experience its rich gastronomic landscape; try the legendary wood-oven lechazo asado at El Asador de Aranda, a juicy suckling lamb with a crispy outside. The restaurant has three locations (in Tibidabo, Londres, and Pau Claris) and focuses on specialties from the Castilla region. When strolling around La Barceloneta, stop for lunch at La Gavina, inside the Palau del Mar building. The menu is built around seafood, and their arroz negro (squid ink rice with seafood and vegetables) is one of the best in town.

Housed in the renovated Santa Caterina Market, this casual eatery serves four types of cuisine: Asian, Mediterranean, Italian, and vegetarian.

Chef Ramón Freixa serves Catalan dishes with a fresh twist like black sesame-crusted langoustines served with corn.

This new brasserie from Barcelona’s hautest chef, Carles Gaig, is perfection, from the sprawling room that’s both cozy and cool to the nuevo catalán menu. Open since 2007, Fonda has already achieved a cult status.

Patrons stand elbow-to-elbow at this tiny bustling tapas bar just off of Pral Lel. With walls of shelves filled with wine, this fifth generation restaurant is not much larger than a typical home dining room.

Pizza? In Spain? Absolutamente. If the toppings include delicious sobrasada sausage and the slowly fermented sourdough crust is featherlight. The pizzeria in question is theis mod, white-and-red newcomer opened by the avant-garde chef Jordi Vilà.

Located in El Palace Hotel, this Michelin one-starred restaurant serves French and Catalan fare from acclaimed chef Romain Fornell.

The past lives on at this historic haunt where actual fishermen order up salt-cod croquettes at a tatty old marble counter. Twenty dollars buys grilled sardines, terrific bacalao fritters, and bomba, a crisp meat-and-mashed-potato cannonball doused in an explosively fiery sauce.

Evo

Located 345 feet above ground, this Michelin one-starred restaurant is housed in a large glass dome atop the Hesperia Tower hotel, just five minutes from the airport.

Don’t miss chefs Montse Moreno and Xavi Manero’s 14-person get-togethers. Best dish: Iberian pork confit.

The boho café near El Born is so green that even the beer is organic. The earthy spelt bread dunks superbly into the saucy meatballs enriched with a hand-pounded almond sauce, and the fluffy brandada de bacalao is painstakingly beaten with olive oil.

Pied piper Pep Manubens has been pulling off culinary magic in this slender slot of a restaurant for the last quarter century. The formula is simple: squeeze through the door and enjoy a bottle of Albariño while you wait for some of the city’s best tapas.

Inside the tiled Barri Gòtic bodega, order fried sardines and the refreshing tomato-and-onion salad that inspired a similar dish at Inopia.

This Catalan, Michelin-starred restaurant was founded by chef-owner Carles Gaig’s great grandmother, in 1896. Originally located in Horta at a 19th-century inn, Gaig moved to the current space at the Hotel Cram in downtown’s Eixample District, in 2004.

Known for its namesake drink - arguably the best in Europe -
L'Eixample's Dry Martini has all the trappings of a classic film-noir
set: emerald-green leather banquettes, white-jacketed waiters, and
plenty of intrigue.