Barcelona

Restaurants in Barcelona

Flanked by the Pyrenees and bathed by the Mediterranean, Barcelona has an unbeatable bounty that makes it one of the prime culinary destinations in the world. Feast on high-end tapas by superstar brothers Ferran and Albert Adrià at Tickets, or seasonal fare at Carles Abellán's Michelin-starred Comerç24. Restaurants in Barcelona also boast touches of Moorish cuisine and, of course, Catalan specialties like mar i muntanya (surf 'n' turf) and crema catalana. In true Spanish style, bares de tapas are also a Barcelona staple, and one of the best ways to explore the city.
You'll want to check out a variety of Barcelona restaurants to fully experience its rich gastronomic landscape; try the legendary wood-oven lechazo asado at El Asador de Aranda, a juicy suckling lamb with a crispy outside. The restaurant has three locations (in Tibidabo, Londres, and Pau Claris) and focuses on specialties from the Castilla region. When strolling around La Barceloneta, stop for lunch at La Gavina, inside the Palau del Mar building. The menu is built around seafood, and their arroz negro (squid ink rice with seafood and vegetables) is one of the best in town.

Among the old fishermen’s houses of Barceloneta, this sepia-toned cervecería is full of local sea dogs and other salty types who come for house-brewed lager and a dizzying array of tapas (boat-fresh squid and shrimp; flash-fried padrón peppers).

Created by the Camper shoe company which also opened the Casa Camper hotel next door on Elisabets Street in north El Raval, FoodBALL is a unique two-room eatery that serves rice balls. Seating is on three tiers of broad steps with woven cushions and small lamps along a green wall.

With its urban-chic décor and classic Catalan dishes such as a salad of tuna belly with Montserrat tomatoes.

This meringue-white L’Eixample storefront belongs to Rafa Peña, the 32-year-old current leader of Spain’s bistronomic movement. Reservations are in high demand, and with good reason with dishes like “souffléed” egg with cured ham cream.

Computer screens light up with the 3,500-label wine list at Monvínic, a wine bar and restaurant featuring communcal tables and an unfinished oak–and–stainless steel interior.

This L'Eixample tavern is known for its Gallic seafood tapas.

Deeper into the market, Ana Gambeta, of the tourist-friendly Bar Central, hawks her baked dorada (bream), her butifarra sausage with white beans, and her tripe casserole—in five languages. "Israelis and Palestinians eat at my counter, shoulder to shoulder," Gambeta boasts.

Located in the Ohla Hotel, near Avinguda Diagonal, the Michelin-starred Saüc (named after the elderberry plant) offers a short menu alongside three tasting menus.

Barcelona’s sophisticated set comes for the classic Catalan fare, such as fluffy buñuelos de bacalao (cod fritters) and Iberian suckling pig, served on a garden terrace.

Hot cocoa goes haute at this sleek shop and café part-owned by Ferran Adrià’s pastry-chef brother, Albert. Dark and dense, the liquid easily qualifies as an alternative energy source. The chocolate-smeared tostada might be overkill, but have it anyway.

A classic bodega in every sense of the word, La Cova Fumada is a small, unassuming, family-run eatery serving authentic Spanish cuisine. The restaurant puts on no airs at all — there are no signs denoting its presence, and there is no formal menu.

A manairó is defined in Catalan as a Pyrenean elf who might secretly complete a cobbler’s work overnight—and owner-chef Jordi Herrera might well be employing a culinary elf or two in his always surprising kitchen.

For more than 80 years, Can Ravell has been selling gourmet food products at its delicatessen and grocery. A seasonal menu brings in patrons looking to dine at the upstairs restaurant, which has marble tables overlooking the retail shop below.

Most Barcelona bars shut down on Sunday nights—which is why Alta Taberna Paco Meralgo is so indispensable. Plus, Paco serves Barcelona’s greatest tomato bread: a flat, split, porous roll grilled to a perfect crunch and slathered with pink, frothy tomato pulp.