Barcelona

Restaurants in Barcelona

With tables at the edge of the beach and views out into the Mediterranean, this popular, family-run seafood and rice specialist dating from the late 1960s ranks high on any short list of Barceloneta dining spots.

With only four tables, calling ahead is necessary for this bright tapas bar. Located near the Metro Sant Antoni stop, this spot specializes in traditional Catalonian tapas.

Known for its namesake drink - arguably the best in Europe -
L'Eixample's Dry Martini has all the trappings of a classic film-noir
set: emerald-green leather banquettes, white-jacketed waiters, and
plenty of intrigue.

This Catalan, Michelin-starred restaurant was founded by chef-owner Carles Gaig’s great grandmother, in 1896. Originally located in Horta at a 19th-century inn, Gaig moved to the current space at the Hotel Cram in downtown’s Eixample District, in 2004.

Among the old fishermen’s houses of Barceloneta, this sepia-toned cervecería is full of local sea dogs and other salty types who come for house-brewed lager and a dizzying array of tapas (boat-fresh squid and shrimp; flash-fried padrón peppers).

Created by the Camper shoe company which also opened the Casa Camper hotel next door on Elisabets Street in north El Raval, FoodBALL is a unique two-room eatery that serves rice balls. Seating is on three tiers of broad steps with woven cushions and small lamps along a green wall.

With its urban-chic décor and classic Catalan dishes such as a salad of tuna belly with Montserrat tomatoes.

At star power of El Bulli’s former chef de cuisine Albert Raurich's latest opening, the setup is half the fun: you enter a traditional tapas bar (it’s actually new) in the Raval quarter.

Everything at this Boquería Market stall is exalted, especially the llanqueta, tiny fried fish served with eggs.

Feed your jamón addiction at the new branch of the venerated Ibérico ham specialist.

Do the prefix dinenr of eclectic cuisine served around the communal table at the arty yet homey spot.

Computer screens light up with the 3,500-label wine list at Monvínic, a wine bar and restaurant featuring communcal tables and an unfinished oak–and–stainless steel interior.

This meringue-white L’Eixample storefront belongs to Rafa Peña, the 32-year-old current leader of Spain’s bistronomic movement. Reservations are in high demand, and with good reason with dishes like “souffléed” egg with cured ham cream.

Part industrial-looking art gallery, part cooperatively run, vegetarian-friendly café (try the house-made spinach ravioli), La Báscula has one of the city's most idyllic sun-filled dining rooms.