Barcelona

Restaurants in Barcelona

Flanked by the Pyrenees and bathed by the Mediterranean, Barcelona has an unbeatable bounty that makes it one of the prime culinary destinations in the world. Feast on high-end tapas by superstar brothers Ferran and Albert Adrià at Tickets, or seasonal fare at Carles Abellán's Michelin-starred Comerç24. Restaurants in Barcelona also boast touches of Moorish cuisine and, of course, Catalan specialties like mar i muntanya (surf 'n' turf) and crema catalana. In true Spanish style, bares de tapas are also a Barcelona staple, and one of the best ways to explore the city.
You'll want to check out a variety of Barcelona restaurants to fully experience its rich gastronomic landscape; try the legendary wood-oven lechazo asado at El Asador de Aranda, a juicy suckling lamb with a crispy outside. The restaurant has three locations (in Tibidabo, Londres, and Pau Claris) and focuses on specialties from the Castilla region. When strolling around La Barceloneta, stop for lunch at La Gavina, inside the Palau del Mar building. The menu is built around seafood, and their arroz negro (squid ink rice with seafood and vegetables) is one of the best in town.

The boho café near El Born is so green that even the beer is organic. The earthy spelt bread dunks superbly into the saucy meatballs enriched with a hand-pounded almond sauce, and the fluffy brandada de bacalao is painstakingly beaten with olive oil.

Pied piper Pep Manubens has been pulling off culinary magic in this slender slot of a restaurant for the last quarter century. The formula is simple: squeeze through the door and enjoy a bottle of Albariño while you wait for some of the city’s best tapas.

Inside the tiled Barri Gòtic bodega, order fried sardines and the refreshing tomato-and-onion salad that inspired a similar dish at Inopia.

Just off Passeig de Gracia, the city’s Art Nouveau shopping street, Tapaç 24 is great for a breakfast of bocadillos (sandwiches) and cafe con leche.

A fine-dining institution since 1967, Via Veneto uses fresh ingredients from the Mediterranean coast in its authentic Catalan cuisine. Helmed by the father-and-son team of José and Pedro Monje, the restaurant's interior is elegant, with Jacquard fabrics, heavy drapery, and jewel-toned accents.

With tables at the edge of the beach and views out into the Mediterranean, this popular, family-run seafood and rice specialist dating from the late 1960s ranks high on any short list of Barceloneta dining spots.

With only four tables, calling ahead is necessary for this bright tapas bar. Located near the Metro Sant Antoni stop, this spot specializes in traditional Catalonian tapas.

Known for its namesake drink - arguably the best in Europe -
L'Eixample's Dry Martini has all the trappings of a classic film-noir
set: emerald-green leather banquettes, white-jacketed waiters, and
plenty of intrigue.

This Catalan, Michelin-starred restaurant was founded by chef-owner Carles Gaig’s great grandmother, in 1896. Originally located in Horta at a 19th-century inn, Gaig moved to the current space at the Hotel Cram in downtown’s Eixample District, in 2004.

Among the old fishermen’s houses of Barceloneta, this sepia-toned cervecería is full of local sea dogs and other salty types who come for house-brewed lager and a dizzying array of tapas (boat-fresh squid and shrimp; flash-fried padrón peppers).

Created by the Camper shoe company which also opened the Casa Camper hotel next door on Elisabets Street in north El Raval, FoodBALL is a unique two-room eatery that serves rice balls. Seating is on three tiers of broad steps with woven cushions and small lamps along a green wall.

With its urban-chic décor and classic Catalan dishes such as a salad of tuna belly with Montserrat tomatoes.

At star power of El Bulli’s former chef de cuisine Albert Raurich's latest opening, the setup is half the fun: you enter a traditional tapas bar (it’s actually new) in the Raval quarter.

Everything at this Boquería Market stall is exalted, especially the llanqueta, tiny fried fish served with eggs.

Feed your jamón addiction at the new branch of the venerated Ibérico ham specialist.