Barcelona

Restaurants in Barcelona

Located in El Palace Hotel, this Michelin one-starred restaurant serves French and Catalan fare from acclaimed chef Romain Fornell.

The past lives on at this historic haunt where actual fishermen order up salt-cod croquettes at a tatty old marble counter. Twenty dollars buys grilled sardines, terrific bacalao fritters, and bomba, a crisp meat-and-mashed-potato cannonball doused in an explosively fiery sauce.

Taverna—which resembles a dozen other barrio bars, with Ronaldinho kicking the ball on the tele suspended above the long marble counter—has a treasure in its 25-year-old chef, Toni Simoes, an alumnus of the three-starred Racó de Can Fabes.

The opening pun (comer, “to eat,” and Carrer Comerç) is fair warning that Carles Abellán is out to play with your mind and palate. At his sleek, red-accented eatery, just around the corner from one of the central plazas in the hopping Born neighborhood, dining is pure entertainment.

Chef Francesc Gimeno Manduley’s low-cost, high-concept miniatures are a marvel of ingenuity.

Don’t bother braving the white-hot dinner scene at this 1933 landmark reopened in 2009 with local superstar Carles Abellán.

Evo

Located 345 feet above ground, this Michelin one-starred restaurant is housed in a large glass dome atop the Hesperia Tower hotel, just five minutes from the airport.

Don’t miss chefs Montse Moreno and Xavi Manero’s 14-person get-togethers. Best dish: Iberian pork confit.

Me

The quiet dining room in L’Eixample experiments with a cuisine at the intersection of Vietnam, New Orleans, and Catalonia. The result: lamb carpaccio topped with caramelized ginger and green-apple relish, and dorado steamed in a banana leaf with coconut milk.

This venue has closed.

Since 1929, this El Born district bar has been serving tapas such as patatas bravas, fresh anchovies in vinegar, and butifarra, a Catalan sausage. The specialty of the house though is chipirónescon mongetes, a warm plate of baby squid and light beans. To accompany meals

Since 2004, the Canadian-Catalan Artal family has engineered a big success in this clean-lined, minimalist space, appealing to hip, young locals with Catalan products and original cookery, and to visitors with explanations of recipes and wines in the language of Shakespeare.

The boho café near El Born is so green that even the beer is organic. The earthy spelt bread dunks superbly into the saucy meatballs enriched with a hand-pounded almond sauce, and the fluffy brandada de bacalao is painstakingly beaten with olive oil.