Barcelona

Restaurants in Barcelona

Flanked by the Pyrenees and bathed by the Mediterranean, Barcelona has an unbeatable bounty that makes it one of the prime culinary destinations in the world. Feast on high-end tapas by superstar brothers Ferran and Albert Adrià at Tickets, or seasonal fare at Carles Abellán's Michelin-starred Comerç24. Restaurants in Barcelona also boast touches of Moorish cuisine and, of course, Catalan specialties like mar i muntanya (surf 'n' turf) and crema catalana. In true Spanish style, bares de tapas are also a Barcelona staple, and one of the best ways to explore the city.
You'll want to check out a variety of Barcelona restaurants to fully experience its rich gastronomic landscape; try the legendary wood-oven lechazo asado at El Asador de Aranda, a juicy suckling lamb with a crispy outside. The restaurant has three locations (in Tibidabo, Londres, and Pau Claris) and focuses on specialties from the Castilla region. When strolling around La Barceloneta, stop for lunch at La Gavina, inside the Palau del Mar building. The menu is built around seafood, and their arroz negro (squid ink rice with seafood and vegetables) is one of the best in town.

Chef Francesc Gimeno Manduley’s low-cost, high-concept miniatures are a marvel of ingenuity.

Don’t bother braving the white-hot dinner scene at this 1933 landmark reopened in 2009 with local superstar Carles Abellán.

Since 1929, this El Born district bar has been serving tapas such as patatas bravas, fresh anchovies in vinegar, and butifarra, a Catalan sausage. The specialty of the house though is chipirónescon mongetes, a warm plate of baby squid and light beans. To accompany meals

Since 2004, the Canadian-Catalan Artal family has engineered a big success in this clean-lined, minimalist space, appealing to hip, young locals with Catalan products and original cookery, and to visitors with explanations of recipes and wines in the language of Shakespeare.

With tables at the edge of the beach and views out into the Mediterranean, this popular, family-run seafood and rice specialist dating from the late 1960s ranks high on any short list of Barceloneta dining spots.

With only four tables, calling ahead is necessary for this bright tapas bar. Located near the Metro Sant Antoni stop, this spot specializes in traditional Catalonian tapas.

At star power of El Bulli’s former chef de cuisine Albert Raurich's latest opening, the setup is half the fun: you enter a traditional tapas bar (it’s actually new) in the Raval quarter.

Everything at this Boquería Market stall is exalted, especially the llanqueta, tiny fried fish served with eggs.

Feed your jamón addiction at the new branch of the venerated Ibérico ham specialist.

Part industrial-looking art gallery, part cooperatively run, vegetarian-friendly café (try the house-made spinach ravioli), La Báscula has one of the city's most idyllic sun-filled dining rooms.

Chef and alchemist Jordi Vilà runs the kitchen at this Michelin one-starred restaurant in the Sagrada Familia district of Barcelona.

Pastry pioneer Jordi Butrón keeps his cool gray, 30-seat, minimalist atelier packed with fans of his all-dessert three- and five-course tasting menus. Expect inspired sweet-savory flavor combos: pear “crackling” and fennel shoots; or chocolate, smoked-tea, and yogurt ice cream.

The restaurant serves traditional Catalonian seafood dishes at a reasonable price.

Order the terrific $17 lunch (a glass of vino included), where the velvety melon gazpacho followed by arroz negro studded with cuttlefish or a perfect seared tuna are served at an industrial-chic space inside the renovated Barceloneta market.