Barcelona

Things to do in Barcelona

At the center of Barcelona’s old city lies the Gothic Quarter, a maze of narrow medieval streets packed with intriguing shops and cafés surrounding the Cathedral de la Seu, which is composed of Roman ruins and Gothic structures. Architecture buffs can’t miss Antoni Gaudí’s modernist structures, like Casa Batlló, La Pedrera, Park Güell, and his masterpiece, the still-unfinished Sagrada Familia. Gaudí’s genius is represented in every imposing structure and whimsical detail of his constructions.
A walk down La Rambla is an unparalleled way to absorb the city’s energy. This tree-lined pedestrian street starts near Plaça de Catalunya and ends at Rambla de Mar, by the water. Find newsstands, souvenir kiosks, street performers and sidewalk cafés along La Rambla, and stop at La Boquería, a magnificent food market, for a bite to eat.
Head to Plaça d’Espanya, a grand square built the 1929 International Exhibition, to be welcomed by the Venetian Towers. Nearby, the Font Mágica de Montjuïc provides a beautiful spectacle of dancing fountains, lights and music in the evenings with the Palau Nacional in the background. For soccer fans, taking a tour of Camp Nou, home of Barcelona FC, is a must. You’ll never run out of things to do in Barcelona.

Ancient Roman walls and Gothic palaces frame the Barri Gòtic's pedestrian streets, which are filled with antiques stores and cafés - all surrounding the central Catedral de la Seu.

Every Thursday, the Plaça de la Seu at the base of the massive 15th-century cathedral—the most famous edifice in Barcelona (not counting the Gaudís)—hosts an outdoor flea market.

One of Spain’s oldest and largest markets, the Mercat de la Boqueria is located just off La Rambla in a cavernous, iron-framed hall.

Enjoy a different perspective of Barcelona from the saddle of a five-speed bike with the help of Biciclot Marítim, a nonprofit bike co-operative founded in 1986.

If you're after a one-stop fiesta, you'll find it here: Six separate spaces, including an open kitchen, a dining room, a casual café, a terrace bar, and a lounge, with dancing on weekends.

The salon is staffed with multilingual, London-trained stylists.

Flowy 1970's vintage caftans and cocktail dresses share the racks with Cucharada's own line of handmade leather bags and accessories.

Pick up spinach-and-pine-nut coca (Catalan pizza) at this old-fashioned bakery.

Urbanized after 1860, L'Eixample (the Expansion) is now the city's main shopping district and the world's top repository of Art Nouveau architecture.

Originating as a collection of rare perfume bottles, this small shop now specializes in vintage couture garments and accessories dating from the 18th century to the 20th.

A colorful fishermen's quarter, the laid-back Barceloneta is lined with seafood restaurants and lovely beaches.

A five-story dance school in the Sants-Montjuïc district, Ball Centre provides dance instruction in several different styles.

Nibble on plump pistachios and Marcona almonds roasted at the 1850’s shop.

Considered the finest example of Catalan Modernist architecture, this 600-year-old former hospital is now a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The result of six small hospitals merging together in 1401, the original complex was rebuilt to meet the demands of modern medicine in 1902.

The principal venue for opera, concerts, and dance since 1847, the hall reopened in 1999 after a major fire and is now one of the most technologically and acoustically advanced theaters in Europe.