Baltimore Travel Guide

One of the newest additions to the Inner Harbor’s waterfront Harborplace, this 3,800-square-foot shop from the Maryland-based company is about more than spices.

Upscale upstairs haven. Two vintage Waterford crystal chandeliers and a 30-foot-long marble bar, built in the late 1800s for a private men's club in Alabama, adorn this lounge at the Brass Elephant restaurant.

Mules stopped pulling coal barges in 1924; now bikers pass locks, lockhouses, and aqueducts while looking for bald eagles.

The stadium is largely credited with starting the league-wide trend toward serving regional cuisine in ballparks when it opened in 1992.

Cruise the harbor affordably (you can get a map of landing points at the tourist center in the Inner Harbor) on one of these open-air, blue-and-white motorboats.

The museum’s updated Contemporary Wing reopened in November 2012, just the first phase of a $24.5 million renovation to be completed in 2014. A new family audio tour (narrated by Matisse’s schnauzer Raoudi) highlights 20 works of art.

Stroll up to the covered 18th-century Lexington Market for picnic fixings and free Friday and Saturday lunchtime jazz and blues concerts.

This energetic space dedicated to visionary art (which is, simply put, created by self-taught artists who play by their own rules) is more fun house than museum. Vollis Simpson’s giant WhirliGig—a 55-foot-tall, wind-powered sculpture made of found objects—welcomes visitors outside.