Bali Travel Guide

Set deep in the Petanu River valley, Goa Gajah—better known as “The Elephant Cave”— houses an ancient (circa 11th-century) Buddhist and Hindu temple that’s one of Bali’s most bewitching tourist attractions.

This glittering salon, which partially occupies the Kerobokan property of owner Sandra McArthur, is filled with fabulous custom-beaded handiwork.

American husband-and-wife team Katherine and Rally Dupps create bold geometric patterns for their cheery line of pillows, table linens, and wall hangings.

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A literal Bali High ensues when you see the island from up above. Air Bali’s aircraft (a Bell 206 helicopter seating four, and a Piper Cheyenne plane seating six) run an array of over-the-top tours (pun intended) from Ngurah Rai Airport.

Many tourists make a quick, guided daytrip to see this 5,000-foot, still-active volcano near the northwestern village of Kintamani—but it’s a much better idea to rent a car and driver, and take your time getting there.

Nightclubs in Bali tend to open and close like wind-beaten shutters, but this all-in-one restaurant/bar/party venue has stayed popular for years, mostly due to its “something for everyone” approach.

Textile gallery and emporium that supports local women's weaving cooperatives.

Set right on the grounds of an elephant sanctuary 30 minutes north of Ubud, the Elephant Safari Park Lodge—opened in March 2008—allows guests to get up close and personal with the park's 27 resident Sumatran pachyderms.

A tented safari-style picnic may sound more Out of Africa than Balinese, but an excursion with Esprite Nomade in the hills outside Ubud is one of the most decadent ways to spend an afternoon on the island.

American owner (and art historian) Susi Johnston and her Italian partner Bruno Piazza make regular treasure-hunting trips through the Southeast Asian outback for one-of-a-kind artifacts—which wind up in their shop. Susi focuses on 18th-century textiles; Bruno on tribal art and ancient jewelry.

The Canadian-born designer moved to Bali more than 30 years ago to study local silversmithing and eventually created a multimillion-dollar business.

Organic café selling indigenous foodstuffs, including local Big Tree Farms' sea salt and spices.

The Sayan Valley, along the Ayung River, is one of the island's most stunningly beautiful places - perfect for a quiet walk.