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In the late 1700s, enslaved Africans carved a gorge, more than 100 feet deep, into a solid limestone hillside with axes and other sharp hand tools. This passageway of 66 sloping steps provided a shorter route from Fort Fincastle to Nassau City, which was needed in case of an attack. The Fort Fincastle Historic Complex is a popular attraction, but the Queen’s Staircase is the most visited. Shady native trees, wall vines and overhanging brush create a moist rainforest like enclosure that make this landmark one of the most picturesque. Bahamians use the Queen’s Staircase as a multipurpose venue for morning exercise and unusual weddings. 

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Queen’s Staircase

In the late 1700s, enslaved Africans carved a gorge, more than 100 feet deep, into a solid limestone hillside with axes and other sharp hand tools. This passageway of 66 sloping steps provided a shorter route from Fort Fincastle to Nassau City, which was needed in case of an attack. The Fort Fincastle Historic Complex is a popular attraction, but the Queen’s Staircase is the most visited. Shady native trees, wall vines and overhanging brush create a moist rainforest like enclosure that make this landmark one of the most picturesque. Bahamians use the Queen’s Staircase as a multipurpose venue for morning exercise and unusual weddings.