Austria

Restaurants in Austria

In the high-altitude hamlet of St. Christoph, this ski-in, ski-out restaurant is a rustic chalet with a cozy atmosphere and a Bordeaux-heavy wine list.

Crowds descend upon Gordon Bukovcan's cozy wine bar throughout the day. After all, the bar is on the lower level of renowned Julius Meinl gourmet supermarket, where many customers head downstairs (shoppping bags in tow) to enjoy a glass of wine.

A family tradition since 1618, Zum Schwarzen Kameel is renowned for its traditional Austrian food. Owner Peter Friese has maintained the restaurant's formidable reputation since 1974, with modern flourishes such as exotic spices taking center stage.

The food here is exceptional, especially the headcheese and clear beef broth with crêpe slivers. The trouble is everybody who works there knows it. There can be an attitude problem.

Wrenkh (lunch for two $40), a wood-paneled place with a busy sidewalk annex, serves light, creative foods sourced from the Naschmarkt, like local venison and a smoked tofu steak atop a bed of polenta.

Travelers hurrying through a visit to Zoo Vienna might easily miss the 1722 farmhouse that houses what is arguably the best restaurant in the zoo.

Open since May 2001, Die Halle has drawn art-loving tourists and Austrians alike with its affordable menu (most breakfast and lunch items are under 10 euros).

Marked by a larger-than-life milk bottle statue, this café is housed in a restored 1903 milk bar in the Wiener Stadtpark (Viennese City Park).

Café Museum, designed in 1899 by pioneering architect Adolf Loos, was closed for nearly a year until new management reopened the old haunt of Egon Schiele and Oskar Kokoschka as a tradition-minded coffeehouse in October 2009.

Mingle with Vienna's upper crust within the glass walls of Fabio's, one of Vienna's most popular and trendiest dining spots.

Though Chef Josef Floh's menu is a little foam-heavy, the arctic char in a creamy, garlicky cucumber sauce, and crispy crêpes piped with parsnip purée redeem him.