Austria

Restaurants in Austria

Expect plenty of hearty, meat-centric dishes on the menu at the restaurants in Austria. While Austria isn’t typically known for its culinary prowess, the nation is seeing a culinary renaissance, and the stick-to-your-ribs, meat-and-potatoes dishes that characterize Austro-Hungarian cuisine are expertly prepared at Austrian restaurants. Prepare for a calorie-fest with popular dishes like wiener schnitzel (boneless meat fried in a coating of flour, egg and breadcrumbs), goulash (a hearty soup or stew of meat and vegetables), and fresh apfelstrudel (apple strudel).

Some of the best restaurants in Austria include Motto am Fluss in Vienna, which serves Austro-international cuisine prepared with organic cuts of meat in a stylish but low-key setting; Steirereck im Stadtpark in Vienna, a Michelin-starred establishment helmed by chef Heinz Reitbauer that offers a modern twist on Austrian classics, like barbecued Alpine beef served with Viennese figs and celery, pan-fried grayling fish with sesame, and a cheese trolley that boasts hundreds of cheese varieties; Magazin in Salzburg, where chef Richard Brunnauer serves dishes inspired by seasonal offerings like scallops with vine-ripened peaches or venison medallions in porcini sauce; and El Gaucho in Graz, an exceptional Argentine steakhouse that will make you swear you’ve been transported to another continent.

Dapper in black tie attire for more than 100 years, the famous tuxedo-clad waiters at this legendary Fourth District restaurant have been serving Austrian specialties — in high style — since Johann Figlmüller opened for business in 1905.

This Viennese salon is where the city's movers and shakers satisfy their morning caffeine and chocolate croissant cravings.

The opening of Old Town's Café Korb, on the corner of Tuchlauben Strasse and Brandstätte, in 1904 was so noteworthy that Emperor Franz Josef attended.

Austria's first "pharmacy restaurant" opened in November 2006 under the moniker Saint Charles Alimentary.

At Austria’s most historic estate, in the idyllic Wachau Valley (just over an hour from Vienna), the Saahs family pioneered biodynamic viticulture back in the 70’s. These days, while Nikolaus Jr. and Sr.

The most central and handsome location of this design-centric mini-chain combines a bar, acres of retail space, and a restaurant where delicious Mediterranean fare—burrata cheese with arugula and 20-year-old vinegar from Austria’s Styria region—is complemented by up to 50 wines by the gl

Café Ritter, which opened in 1867, declared bankruptcy in 2009 and an H&M clothing store was set to occupy its quarters, in a former aristocratic palace, until a "Save Café Ritter" page on Facebook attracted 4,600 fans. (For now, a new owner has rescued it from extinction.)

In the heart of poppy territory, Mohnwirt uses the seeds in noodles, dumplings, to crust fish, essentially everything. Try the Viennese-style torte, seven five-millimeter layers interposed with a mixture of whipped cream and poppy seeds.

The mountaintop restaurant serves local specialties (pig’s knuckle with honey-infused sauerkraut, followed by Kaiserschmarren, a crêpelike dessert).

Perhaps one of the most famous restaurants in Vienna, Trzesniewski is often overrun with hungry locals and tourists fighting for space along the buffet line. The restaurant itself is small, and with only six or seven tables, seating is at a premium.

Serving Italian-inspired Austrian fare, this two-story restaurant is housed inside the 17th-century Palais Collalto, a Baroque palace where the six-year-old Mozart gave his first Viennese concert.