Austria

Restaurants in Austria

Expect plenty of hearty, meat-centric dishes on the menu at the restaurants in Austria. While Austria isn’t typically known for its culinary prowess, the nation is seeing a culinary renaissance, and the stick-to-your-ribs, meat-and-potatoes dishes that characterize Austro-Hungarian cuisine are expertly prepared at Austrian restaurants. Prepare for a calorie-fest with popular dishes like wiener schnitzel (boneless meat fried in a coating of flour, egg and breadcrumbs), goulash (a hearty soup or stew of meat and vegetables), and fresh apfelstrudel (apple strudel).

Some of the best restaurants in Austria include Motto am Fluss in Vienna, which serves Austro-international cuisine prepared with organic cuts of meat in a stylish but low-key setting; Steirereck im Stadtpark in Vienna, a Michelin-starred establishment helmed by chef Heinz Reitbauer that offers a modern twist on Austrian classics, like barbecued Alpine beef served with Viennese figs and celery, pan-fried grayling fish with sesame, and a cheese trolley that boasts hundreds of cheese varieties; Magazin in Salzburg, where chef Richard Brunnauer serves dishes inspired by seasonal offerings like scallops with vine-ripened peaches or venison medallions in porcini sauce; and El Gaucho in Graz, an exceptional Argentine steakhouse that will make you swear you’ve been transported to another continent.

Formerly a wine tavern and now a modern take on the traditional beisl, or pub, Gasthaus Wild serves traditional Viennese fare in a welcoming, neighborhood-like atmosphere. The interior is dominated by sturdy, dark wood tables and chairs, and yellow walls brighten the space.

The restaurant has a ravishing stone terrace where you dine amid old-fashioned roses, mixed borders, wisteria vines, and an emerald lawn with a velour pile. The waitresses wear checked dirndls, buttoned bodices, and smocked aprons and don't even look ridiculous.

Though it’s welcomed plenty of tourists over its 137 years—not to mention habitués like Freud, Lenin, and Trotsky—the utterly grand café inside the majestic Palais Ferstel is known among pastry-obsessed Wieners for serving the best, flakiest strudel in town.

Owned by celebrated Steirereck alum Helmut Österreicher, this namesake restaurant is housed inside the Museum für Angewandte Kunst (MAK), or Museum of Applied Arts.

Part of Hotel Sacher Wien, Rote Bar has a more relaxed, yet still luxurious, dining experience than its sister restaurant, the Anna Sacher.

This Viennese salon is where the city's movers and shakers satisfy their morning caffeine and chocolate croissant cravings.

The opening of Old Town's Café Korb, on the corner of Tuchlauben Strasse and Brandstätte, in 1904 was so noteworthy that Emperor Franz Josef attended.

The most central and handsome location of this design-centric mini-chain combines a bar, acres of retail space, and a restaurant where delicious Mediterranean fare—burrata cheese with arugula and 20-year-old vinegar from Austria’s Styria region—is complemented by up to 50 wines by the gl

Perhaps one of the most famous restaurants in Vienna, Trzesniewski is often overrun with hungry locals and tourists fighting for space along the buffet line. The restaurant itself is small, and with only six or seven tables, seating is at a premium.

Vienna’s historic Innere Stadt district is home to Indochine 21, the hotspot for trendy diners to enjoy cocktails and French-Vietnamese fusion. Chef Wini Brugger brings to the table over a decade of training in Southeast Asia, having formerly resided in Vietnam.

The fashionable cafe has a glass-enclosed winter garden designed by the cutting-edge Austrian firm Wehdorn Architects, that poses a striking contrast to the wood-paneled Jugendstil interior lit by ornate brass chandeliers.

Crowds descend upon Gordon Bukovcan's cozy wine bar throughout the day. After all, the bar is on the lower level of renowned Julius Meinl gourmet supermarket, where many customers head downstairs (shoppping bags in tow) to enjoy a glass of wine.

Wrenkh (lunch for two $40), a wood-paneled place with a busy sidewalk annex, serves light, creative foods sourced from the Naschmarkt, like local venison and a smoked tofu steak atop a bed of polenta.

Travelers hurrying through a visit to Zoo Vienna might easily miss the 1722 farmhouse that houses what is arguably the best restaurant in the zoo.