Austria

Restaurants in Austria

Expect plenty of hearty, meat-centric dishes on the menu at the restaurants in Austria. While Austria isn’t typically known for its culinary prowess, the nation is seeing a culinary renaissance, and the stick-to-your-ribs, meat-and-potatoes dishes that characterize Austro-Hungarian cuisine are expertly prepared at Austrian restaurants. Prepare for a calorie-fest with popular dishes like wiener schnitzel (boneless meat fried in a coating of flour, egg and breadcrumbs), goulash (a hearty soup or stew of meat and vegetables), and fresh apfelstrudel (apple strudel).

Some of the best restaurants in Austria include Motto am Fluss in Vienna, which serves Austro-international cuisine prepared with organic cuts of meat in a stylish but low-key setting; Steirereck im Stadtpark in Vienna, a Michelin-starred establishment helmed by chef Heinz Reitbauer that offers a modern twist on Austrian classics, like barbecued Alpine beef served with Viennese figs and celery, pan-fried grayling fish with sesame, and a cheese trolley that boasts hundreds of cheese varieties; Magazin in Salzburg, where chef Richard Brunnauer serves dishes inspired by seasonal offerings like scallops with vine-ripened peaches or venison medallions in porcini sauce; and El Gaucho in Graz, an exceptional Argentine steakhouse that will make you swear you’ve been transported to another continent.

Café Ritter, which opened in 1867, declared bankruptcy in 2009 and an H&M clothing store was set to occupy its quarters, in a former aristocratic palace, until a "Save Café Ritter" page on Facebook attracted 4,600 fans. (For now, a new owner has rescued it from extinction.)

Serving Italian-inspired Austrian fare, this two-story restaurant is housed inside the 17th-century Palais Collalto, a Baroque palace where the six-year-old Mozart gave his first Viennese concert.

In the high-altitude hamlet of St. Christoph, this ski-in, ski-out restaurant is a rustic chalet with a cozy atmosphere and a Bordeaux-heavy wine list.

A family tradition since 1618, Zum Schwarzen Kameel is renowned for its traditional Austrian food. Owner Peter Friese has maintained the restaurant's formidable reputation since 1974, with modern flourishes such as exotic spices taking center stage.

Open since May 2001, Die Halle has drawn art-loving tourists and Austrians alike with its affordable menu (most breakfast and lunch items are under 10 euros).

Though Chef Josef Floh's menu is a little foam-heavy, the arctic char in a creamy, garlicky cucumber sauce, and crispy crêpes piped with parsnip purée redeem him.

Inside the century-old Hotel Bristol next to the world famous opera house, Korso bei der Oper draws after-opera crowds by night for formal, elaborate dinners—and those in search of a more casual lunch, by day.

Julius Meinl am Graben is all about Mediterranean-Austrian fusion cuisine. Tucked behind a grandiose cheese display in his cafe of the same name is this dignified, wood-paneled dining room with white tablecloths and soft lighting.

Come in for pitch-perfect thin-crust pizza.

Brave the Helmut Newton-style photographs of women wearing grapes instead of underwear and order the semolina-filled strudel, cooked in broth, bathed in butter, and served with a vinegary salad of green beans and red onions.

Dapper in black tie attire for more than 100 years, the famous tuxedo-clad waiters at this legendary Fourth District restaurant have been serving Austrian specialties — in high style — since Johann Figlmüller opened for business in 1905.