Austria

Things to do in Austria

No matter what the season, it is impossible to run out of things to do in Austria, whether you’re looking for ski slopes to hit in the winter or powerful historical sights to visit in the summer. Austria is chock full of stunning cathedral architecture. Stephansdom (or St. Stephen’s Cathedral) in Vienna is a marvel of Gothic architecture both inside and out, with dazzling stained-glass windows and a tiled roof decorated with chevrons and Austrian eagles. Vienna’s Schloss Schönbrunn is another can’t-miss sight – guided tours of the palace will take you through the grand legacy of the Habsburg family as you tour 26 sumptuous and perfectly preserved rooms. If you’re wondering what to do in Salzburg, the Festung Hohensalzburg is a main attraction. This 900-year-old military fortress is a powerful reminder of the country’s former military prowess and offers sweeping views of the Salzach River and the mountains. Salzburg’s marble, stucco and frescoed Schlosskonzerte music hall is also an exquisite venue for chamber-music concerts.
Snow bunnies looking for things to do in Austria should take note of the abundance of ski slopes and resort towns available for a winter visit. Some of the best ski towns in Austria include Heilegenblut, a small village whose easily accessible mountains attract tourists in both winter and summer; Semmering, a favorite among Vienna residents that offers fabulous ski slopes in winter as well as a relaxing spa; Bad Gastein, known for its 19th-century feel, its first-class skiing as well as its year-round therapeutic spas; Zell am See, famous for the sapphire-blue Zeller See lake and its picturesque snow-capped peaks; and Innsbruck, where you can visit the late-medieval old town and Habsburg palaces when you’re not hitting the slopes.

Stick to the northern end for farmer produce and fancy offerings, including Gegenbauer, with casks of homemade oils and vinegars, and Alles Seife’s handmade soap.

A lively disco where Swedish ski instructors and European vacationers down frothy steins and ski-booted table dancing is de rigueur.

A prominent tourist attraction in Schlosspark since the 1960's, the former summer residence of the Hapsburgs is a true Baroque palace. Within its lacquered and gilded walls are 1,441 rooms filled with priceless artifacts of Austria's longest reigning royal family.

Situated on the sixth floor of the Do & Co Hotel, the space has windows about 30 feet high looking straight across Stephansplatz at the tiled roof and towers of the Gothic St. Stephen's Cathedral.

Located on one of Vienna’s chicest streets, repurposes household and office items into furniture, including lamps made of used celluloid and a funky chaise longue created from old three-ring binders.

Originally commissioned by Emperor Franz Josef I of Austria-Hungary to house the Habsburgs' vast art collection, the Naturhistorisches (Natural History Museum) is one of the most prominent museums in the world. Like its identical twin opposite Maria-Theresien Platz, the Museum of Fine Ar

Although world famous, the Riesenrad isn't the only thing consistently drawing crowds to Vienna's amusement park.

Mozart lived in the grand rooms of this Vienna apartment longer than any other place, from 1784 to 1787. The composer's former residence is the last one remaining in Vienna today. Built near St.

Otto Wagner's seminal 1906 architectural triumph is now a museum. Its glazed double-vaulted ceiling was a major innovation.

The Austrian Museum of Applied Arts/Contemporary Art focuses on the importance of design, and its holdings include furniture, china, and textiles dating from the Middle Ages to the present day.

The complex includes the Architekturzentrum Wien; the Leopold Museum; the Museum Moderner Kunst; the Kunsthalle Wien; and more.

Centrally located in Vienna's Innere Stadt district, the Wiener Staatsoper is one of the city's most photographed structures. Completed in 1869, the ornate opera house was designed in the Neo-Renaissance style with sweeping ceilings and gilded moldings.