Australia

Restaurants in Australia

Restaurants in Australia are known for their variety of international cuisines. Their food has a certain British influence, but also many Asian styles have become popular in the urban areas. Saffron is known to be one of the best Indian places in Darwin. It is contemporary style with authentic Indian cooking. There is an array of vegetarian choices, but also great chicken dishes for the main course, lamb, and local caught barramundi fish. For local cuisine with a French twist, try Mojo’s in Queensland. Remi Pougeard-Dulimbert and Michael Hart joined forces for the restaurant at the gateway to the Daintree Rainforest. They do specialties as gnocchi with blue cheese, chilli soft shell crab, and pork belly spring rolls.

Australia restaurants offer excellent views. For the best views on Station Pier in Melbourne, dine at My Dog Café. The place serves great human food, and dog treats as well. The Stirling Hotel’s recent renovations make the establishment a beautiful place to dine. It offers a bistro with upmarket pub food, and a fine restaurant that serves regional cuisine. It is always packed and one of the best restaurants in Australia.

Arthur’s simply loves pizza. Case in point: the battle for the rights to Arthur’s Pizza went all the way to the highest court in New South Wales.

Not to be confused with the local vegetarian restaurant of the same name, this Chinatown restaurant serves traditional Taiwanese fare in a small, often crowded space at the end of the Dixon Street pedestrian mall.

Owner Denis Horgan arrived from Perth in the mid 1950’s to surf. He invested in land, and set down roots with Robert Mondavi as his mentor. Horgan's lemony Chardonnays have been called Australia’s best.

Darlinghurst visitors may drop by this small café for a cup of coffee or a snack, and end up staying for an Italian entrée.

Chef Bill Granger’s second breakfast joint—named, with typical Aussie matter-of-factness, Bills—is a morning pit stop for hungry locals, who come for the hearty portions and low-key vibe: the chalkboard menu changes daily and you’ll find piles of well-thumbed newspapers scattered around.

Yhe fresh Italian dishes (pan-fried whiting wrapped in lardo; pappardelle with wild-boar ragù) are as stunning as the Pacific vistas.

Occupying a 1930’s beach-club changing area on breathtaking Balmoral Beach (about a half-hour ferry ride north from Sydney Harbour), Bather’s incorporates both a refined dining room and a more casual café.

Just down the street from Coogee Beach, this cash-only seafood joint serves an unusually varied menu compared to the average fish-and-chips restaurant.

The menu is small but ambitious—saltimbocca, duck rillettes, complicated pizzas. Order the bouillabaisse, Marseilles-style, with mussels, scallops, prawns, potatoes, fennel, and cayenne pepper. Bring a bottle of wine as the restaurant is BYOB.

A Sydney institution, this small bakery across the street from the Powerhouse Museum is the supplier of the famous Harry’s Café de Wheels pie cart.