Restaurants in Austin

There’s no better place to go for burgers and shakes, especially since this casual joint with great outdoor seating and a big playground is connected to the Austin-born Amy’s Ice Cream (try the Mexican Vanilla).

Located in Austin’s up-and-coming East Side, Justine’s is a fantastic French bistro that attracts a stylish hipster crew, eager for expertly crafted steak frites and garlicky escargot.


This high-end downtown sushi spot in the warehouse district is marked by blue neon lighting that runs along the edge of the building. Inside, the dark, contemporary dining area is highlighted by Eastern accents such as rice paper partitioning and ikebana arrangements.

The Driskill Grill, located in the luxur

At this unassuming restaurant in Cherrywood, local chef-owner Hoover Alexander serves Deep South—style comfort food with Tex-Mex, Cajun, and Jamaican influences.

The restaurant looks and feels like a farmer's market and supports local farmers and business. It uses only biodegradable, compostable, or recycled products, including cutlery made from potatoes.

Located in the Warehouse District, Ranch 616 specializes in South Texas cuisine, with an emphasis on Gulf Coast seafood, wild game, and bold spices.

Despite its unassuming strip mall location, this New American restaurant is often lauded as one of the best in the city. The dining room is intimate and understated, with about 15 white-clothed tables and windows screened with Japanese washi (rice paper).

Located off the beaten path in the West Campus neighborhood, this second-story restaurant is known for its Mediterranean small plates and inventive cocktails. The covered patio caters to a 30-something happy hour crowd, while the candlelit dining room is popular with couples.

The postmodern barbecue joint, housed among mid-construction condo buildings in an airy, historic brick warehouse, delivers outstanding barbecued chicken, moist and with a clove-y smoke character. Chase your bbq with a hoppy Lost Gold IPA from Blanco, Texas.

Chefs who try to fancify lowbrow food warrant suspicion but not immediate dismissal. Max’s Wine Dive in Austin is a perfect example of why checking it out is smart. Advertised awkwardly as “upscale comfort food,” its fried chicken is better described as Tex-Mex soul.

Go for some Texas barbecue at the low-key Artz Rib House, where for $16.99 you can get messy with a full rack of baby-back ribs.