Arizona

Restaurants in Arizona

No doubt, restaurants in Arizona offer plenty of good places to eat quality Southwestern and Mexican-influenced cuisine—whether that means cowboy-friendly steaks or grilled cactus that fills tacos, top salads, or is eaten as an appetizer. One not-so-gourmet—but beloved—Arizona restaurant staple is the Sonoran hot dog, where the frank is wrapped in bacon then topped with beans, onions, salsa, and peppers. But especially in the cities such as Sedona, Scottsdale and Tucson, you’ll also find a pretty international selection, and some of the best restaurants in Arizona. The Steak Out Restaurant and Saloon’s frontier-inspired design and weathered-wood exterior brings the Old West to life in this Tucson restaurant. Great mesquite-grilled steaks, ribs, chicken, and fish, washed down with margaritas to the twang of country music.
Not many people come to the desert for great pizza, but Pizzeria Blanco’s brick oven in Phoenix regularly makes the lists of the best gourmet pizza in the U.S. Be prepared to wait in line. Helmed by French-trained chef Vincent Guerithault, Vincent on Camelback is a longtime favorite in the Phoenix area is an excellent choice for classically informed Mexican fare, such as the rich, spicy duck tamales with Anaheim chile and raisins, or grilled wild boar loin in a habanero sauce. René at Tlaquepaque has French-meets-cowboy-cuisine in Sedona’s toney shopping plaza and is known for its rack of lamb, escargot and antelope carpaccio.

There aren’t many frills as this wood-bedecked café, but it’s got a fireplace and serves all sorts of comfort food: biscuits and gravy, homemade soups, and all sorts of cobblers (try the peach, apple, or blackberry).

Unlike most Scottsdale restaurants, Atlas Bistro really does have a bring-your-own bottle of wine policy. Why? Because this tiny bistro sits right next door to AZ Wine Company, which carries more than 2,000 bottles.

The restaurant serves good home-style grub—breakfast kielbasa-and-potato omelettes, pot roast, and yes, wonderfully juicy burgers.

Chef Vincent Guerithault was trained in French haute cuisine, but since 1986 he’s been blending his classic experience with influences from Mexico and California, and serving it all up in a rustic, elegant setting of several small rooms w

The window seats offer primo views of private jets flying up and down the runway. Stop by and fuel up with a Red Rock Omelet (avocado, tomato, bacon, jack cheese) in the morning.

The family-owned restaurant is family-friendly and great for those who like their Mexican and New Mexican food hot. Order anything that’s fried; both the chimichangas and sopaipillas are superlative.

At this popular Mexican eatery, an expansive banquet hall adjoins an equally cavernous dining room. Vibrantly colored sails hang high above to absorb some of the mariachi music reverberating off the tiled floor—creating a festive and raucous atmosphere.

Sample a burrito filled with carne seca (air-dried beef) at this original location.

John Wayne ate here, so a meal is obligatory for all True Grit fans. Keep in mind: real cowboys order steak. And don’t let the kitschy steer on the roof put you off.