Argentina

Restaurants in Argentina

You could spend weeks eating at in restaurants in Argentina and never tire of the great local beef—whether it’s a thick steak or a beef-filled empanada —paired with a full-bodied local Malbec. The landscape of restaurants in Argentina is a result of the rustic and simple cuisine of the indigenous Gauchos and Argentinian people, as well as a mix of French, Italian and Spanish influences. For a taste of rugged Argentinian culture, try the classic spot Estilo Campo in the Puerto Madero area of Buenos Aires. Waiters recreate an Argentinian cowboy culture, dressed in the uniform of Gauchos, and serving up sturdy steakhouse cuisine—plenty of beef, as well as pork loin, venison and wild boar.

Cumaná is a regional-style Argentina restaurant off Avenida Santa Fe in Buenos Aires and showcases hearty comfort foods such as empanadas, tamales-style humitas and cazuelas, stews made with meat, potatoes, squash, corn, eggplant and more. You may encounter a line, but the food and prices are worth it.1884 Francis Mallmann is the top spot to eat in Mendoza and one of the best restaurants in Argentina. It offers a celebrity chef dining experience, with an emphasis on beef (of course), as well as chivito (kid goat), in a rehabbed wine cellar.

Of the dozens of fine steak houses that line the picturesque docks of Puerto Madero, Las Lilas is arguably the best (and certainly the most famous: Jenna Bush reportedly dined here in 2007).

An esplanade over the Río de la Plata makes this Italian restaurant one of the city's top dining experiences. Mushroom risotto and creamy gnocchi with ham are perfectly al dente.

Cocina criolla—northern Argentinean flavor—rules at this no-frills, dirt-cheap cult favorite across from the Parque Las Heras. The carne picante (spicy beef) empanada is the juiciest in town, and the carbonada stew teeming with pumpkin and corn spells comfort food.

Dine on entrecôte and sip Malbec while dancers perform moves such as boleos and gaunchos at Esquina Carlos Gardel, the city's top dinner club—and one of Gardel's old haunts.

Located in the Recoleta neighborhood, Cumaná serves both Argentine dishes and non-traditional fare like wood-fired pizzas. Lanterns and shelves of ornamental bottles decorate the bright, orange walls.

Persicco serves what’s often considered the best ice cream in Buenos Aires, so the new airport outpost of this Italian-style gelatería is a pre-departure must-do.

This boisterous spot is known for grilled meats and fish.

In otherwise trendy Palermo Hollywood, this brightly lit parrilla is a no-frills affair. But the perfectly prepared bife de lomo (beef tenderloin) and matambrito (pork flank) and low prices keep it packed with locals.

The Scene: In steak-mad B.A., a fish- and veggie-focused supper club is a welcome dining option—even better that it’s in the cozy Chacarita neighborhood home of a 33-year-old vegan-leaning chef, Diego Felix, who enchants visitors with indigenous South American ingredients.

Since the restaurant’s revamp in 2009, politicos have returned for the modern takes on classic Porteño fare—mushroom-stuffed squid and tender suckling pig roasted in a clay oven—in the classic oak-paneled dining room.

Tucked behind the Four Seasons hotel is La Mansion, an 88-year-old Belle Époque mansion built by Felix Alzaga Unzué as a wedding gift for his wife. Four Seasons dropped $1 million on a restoration of the regal building’s frescoes, marble, and 24-karat-gold-trimmed wood paneling.