Argentina

Restaurants in Argentina

A refreshing alternative to the city’s ubiquitous steakhouses, Oviedo is a Spanish-inspired seafood restaurant in the Recoleta neighborhood. Inside, glass orb chandeliers illuminate the dining room, which is decorated with dark mahogany trim, classic white tablecloths, and ocean-themed artwork.

Argentina’s McDonald’s have long featured what America’s Golden Arches are just beginning to add: an attached Starbucks-style coffee shop. Enjoy a double cappuccino and the expansive views of bustling Ezeiza on the McCafe’s large outdoor seating area.

An unmarked doorway in Villa Crespo conceals Almacén Secreto, the private kingdom of chef Abigail Machicado, who prepares dishes from Argentina's south (venison raviolones), center (oven-baked Paraná River fish), and north (charquisillo, a stew made with cured meat).

Compare Malbecs from Argentina’s different regions around this tall
marble tasting bar. Here, superman sommelier Marcelo Rebolé oversees a
7,000-bottle cellar with some five dozen by-the-glass offerings
complemented by house-aged cheeses.

Since the restaurant’s revamp in 2009, politicos have returned for the modern takes on classic Porteño fare—mushroom-stuffed squid and tender suckling pig roasted in a clay oven—in the classic oak-paneled dining room.

In otherwise trendy Palermo Hollywood, this brightly lit parrilla is a no-frills affair. But the perfectly prepared bife de lomo (beef tenderloin) and matambrito (pork flank) and low prices keep it packed with locals.

The Scene: In steak-mad B.A., a fish- and veggie-focused supper club is a welcome dining option—even better that it’s in the cozy Chacarita neighborhood home of a 33-year-old vegan-leaning chef, Diego Felix, who enchants visitors with indigenous South American ingredients.

Located in the Palermo Viejo district, Azema Exotic Bistro serves an innovative fusion of Creole, Caribbean, Vietnamese, and French cuisines.

Owned by chef Federico Simoes, this Palermo Soho restaurant serves Mediterranean-Argentinean cuisine in a small, understated dining room.

This tall, airy storefront in Palermo Viejo is presided over by the colorful Cecilia Hermann, who could have stepped out of a magical-realist novel. Guardian of Argentina’s culinary traditions—with a penchant for angel figurines—she presents a nearly anthropological display of sweets.

In the ever-evolving Palermo Viejo, glamorous restaurants come and go within a week, but this spacious destination, housed in a converted manor, has stood the test of time (and economic crisis).

Don’t expect the same tasty pies from this porteño pizzeria’s Ezeiza location. The Italian menu here is basic, with classic sandwiches (ham and cheese; tomato, basil, and mozzarella, etc.) and overpriced salads. It is also a full coffee shop, with espresso, lattes, and pastries.