Restaurants in Argentina

One of the classic Buenos Aires pizza joints, El Cuartito started serving Argentina’s famous crusty pizzas in 1934.

This 1954 stalwart on a hard-to-find street in La Boca serves up nostalgia alongside plump steaks, tortillas de papa, and shared tureens of homey soup. Yes, that is a photo of Bono and Francis Ford Coppola on the wall.

Don’t judge yet. This American chain is a different creature in Argentina, having added waiter service and a rather refined atmosphere to its offering of hamburgers and fries. Ezeiza’s new 4,300-square-foot outpost—open 24/7—also serves the only truly affordable fare in the airport.

Of all the steak houses in this carnivorous city, La Brigada may have the most loyal following: members of the national soccer team are regulars. Have the colita de lomo, a sirloin tail so buttery you can cut it with a spoon.

Cocina criolla—northern Argentinean flavor—rules at this no-frills, dirt-cheap cult favorite across from the Parque Las Heras. The carne picante (spicy beef) empanada is the juiciest in town, and the carbonada stew teeming with pumpkin and corn spells comfort food.

An esplanade over the Río de la Plata makes this Italian restaurant one of the city's top dining experiences. Mushroom risotto and creamy gnocchi with ham are perfectly al dente.

Stuck in a late-Modernist time warp amid the Microcentro bustle, this 60’s café is for certain media and politico types an office, living room, and caffeine-emergency ward.

Although opened in 2001, Social La Lechuza oozes the atmosphere of the best old-school neighborhood parrillas (steak joints).

Popular with the A-list set, Casa Cruz is an upscale Argentinean restaurant known for its clubby atmosphere, lively bar scene, and contemporary cuisine. Located in trendy Palermo Soho, the restaurant is marked only by a set of imposing, 16-foot brass doors.

High-end adaptations of local cuisine.

Dine on entrecôte and sip Malbec while dancers perform moves such as boleos and gaunchos at Esquina Carlos Gardel, the city's top dinner club—and one of Gardel's old haunts.