Argentina

Restaurants in Argentina

You could spend weeks eating at in restaurants in Argentina and never tire of the great local beef—whether it’s a thick steak or a beef-filled empanada —paired with a full-bodied local Malbec. The landscape of restaurants in Argentina is a result of the rustic and simple cuisine of the indigenous Gauchos and Argentinian people, as well as a mix of French, Italian and Spanish influences. For a taste of rugged Argentinian culture, try the classic spot Estilo Campo in the Puerto Madero area of Buenos Aires. Waiters recreate an Argentinian cowboy culture, dressed in the uniform of Gauchos, and serving up sturdy steakhouse cuisine—plenty of beef, as well as pork loin, venison and wild boar.

Cumaná is a regional-style Argentina restaurant off Avenida Santa Fe in Buenos Aires and showcases hearty comfort foods such as empanadas, tamales-style humitas and cazuelas, stews made with meat, potatoes, squash, corn, eggplant and more. You may encounter a line, but the food and prices are worth it.1884 Francis Mallmann is the top spot to eat in Mendoza and one of the best restaurants in Argentina. It offers a celebrity chef dining experience, with an emphasis on beef (of course), as well as chivito (kid goat), in a rehabbed wine cellar.

In a neighborhood better known for nouvelle cuisine treatments of Argentine food, Pablo Rivero and his parents built Don Julio into a mainstay by presenting top-quality plates of classic parrilla steak-house fare.

A refreshing alternative to the city’s ubiquitous steakhouses, Oviedo is a Spanish-inspired seafood restaurant in the Recoleta neighborhood. Inside, glass orb chandeliers illuminate the dining room, which is decorated with dark mahogany trim, classic white tablecloths, and ocean-themed artwork.

Argentina’s McDonald’s have long featured what America’s Golden Arches are just beginning to add: an attached Starbucks-style coffee shop. Enjoy a double cappuccino and the expansive views of bustling Ezeiza on the McCafe’s large outdoor seating area.

Located in the Palermo Viejo district, Azema Exotic Bistro serves an innovative fusion of Creole, Caribbean, Vietnamese, and French cuisines.

Owned by chef Federico Simoes, this Palermo Soho restaurant serves Mediterranean-Argentinean cuisine in a small, understated dining room.

This tall, airy storefront in Palermo Viejo is presided over by the colorful Cecilia Hermann, who could have stepped out of a magical-realist novel. Guardian of Argentina’s culinary traditions—with a penchant for angel figurines—she presents a nearly anthropological display of sweets.

There’s no menu—you just sit down and they bring you food, like ensalada de pulpo. If you see something going by that you like, you just ask for half of it.

The 1998 shuttering of this 124-year-old café caused such an uproar that within six weeks the city legislature gave it historic protection to save it; a 2001 restoration of the over-the-top elegance of the interior, with its three 19th-century stained-glass windows and marble bar, returned the Fr

Here’s a nook once loved by Jorge Luis Borges. Over there, a table favored by tango singer Carlos Gardel. Here, your café con crema comes surrounded by history. Order the tostado especial Tortoni, the world’s biggest yet lightest grilled cheese, ham, and tomato sandwich.

Owner Luis Acuna founded El Pobre Luis back in 1986, and the unassuming Núñez parrilla has become one of the city’s most legendary. Poor Lou, as hes called, is credited with first bringing the style of asado (grilled meat) from his native Uruguay to Buenos Aires.

Olsen transports diners from Palermo Viejo to Scandinavia with its seafood-heavy menu and impressive selection of more than 60 vodkas. Dishes like blini, smoked herring, and red tuna are a large part of the restaurant’s allure, but so is the 60’s-inspired dining room, set in a former warehouse.