Argentina

Restaurants in Argentina

You could spend weeks eating at in restaurants in Argentina and never tire of the great local beef—whether it’s a thick steak or a beef-filled empanada —paired with a full-bodied local Malbec. The landscape of restaurants in Argentina is a result of the rustic and simple cuisine of the indigenous Gauchos and Argentinian people, as well as a mix of French, Italian and Spanish influences. For a taste of rugged Argentinian culture, try the classic spot Estilo Campo in the Puerto Madero area of Buenos Aires. Waiters recreate an Argentinian cowboy culture, dressed in the uniform of Gauchos, and serving up sturdy steakhouse cuisine—plenty of beef, as well as pork loin, venison and wild boar.

Cumaná is a regional-style Argentina restaurant off Avenida Santa Fe in Buenos Aires and showcases hearty comfort foods such as empanadas, tamales-style humitas and cazuelas, stews made with meat, potatoes, squash, corn, eggplant and more. You may encounter a line, but the food and prices are worth it.1884 Francis Mallmann is the top spot to eat in Mendoza and one of the best restaurants in Argentina. It offers a celebrity chef dining experience, with an emphasis on beef (of course), as well as chivito (kid goat), in a rehabbed wine cellar.

Palermo’s new hidden gem, helmed by a pair of young chefs whose résumés include stints at such avant-garde temples as Fat Duck and Mugaritz. The daily-changing blackboard lunch menus are breezy affairs, featuring decadent risottos of the day and locavore salads.

Of all the steak houses in this carnivorous city, La Brigada may have the most loyal following: members of the national soccer team are regulars. Have the colita de lomo, a sirloin tail so buttery you can cut it with a spoon.

Although opened in 2001, Social La Lechuza oozes the atmosphere of the best old-school neighborhood parrillas (steak joints).

Popular with the A-list set, Casa Cruz is an upscale Argentinean restaurant known for its clubby atmosphere, lively bar scene, and contemporary cuisine. Located in trendy Palermo Soho, the restaurant is marked only by a set of imposing, 16-foot brass doors.

High-end adaptations of local cuisine.

Chef Alejandro Marchant offers a sophisticated take on regional cuisine: wild boar prosciutto with sauerkraut, venison robed in honey and balsamic vinegar.

Located in the affluent Puerto Madero neighborhood and within walking distance of a handful of high-end hotel chains, this steakhouse serves the usual lineup of Argentinean parilla beef, principally to tourists.

The interiors here are taberna-meets-brasserie, and while the Porteño grilled-beef classics are exemplary, well-heeled Recoleta regulars come for the expertly sizzled parillada de mar (seafood grill).

Compare Malbecs from Argentina’s different regions around this tall
marble tasting bar. Here, superman sommelier Marcelo Rebolé oversees a
7,000-bottle cellar with some five dozen by-the-glass offerings
complemented by house-aged cheeses.

An unmarked doorway in Villa Crespo conceals Almacén Secreto, the private kingdom of chef Abigail Machicado, who prepares dishes from Argentina's south (venison raviolones), center (oven-baked Paraná River fish), and north (charquisillo, a stew made with cured meat).

In the ever-evolving Palermo Viejo, glamorous restaurants come and go within a week, but this spacious destination, housed in a converted manor, has stood the test of time (and economic crisis).