Restaurants in Argentina

Owned by chef Federico Simoes, this Palermo Soho restaurant serves Mediterranean-Argentinean cuisine in a small, understated dining room.

This tall, airy storefront in Palermo Viejo is presided over by the colorful Cecilia Hermann, who could have stepped out of a magical-realist novel. Guardian of Argentina’s culinary traditions—with a penchant for angel figurines—she presents a nearly anthropological display of sweets.

In the ever-evolving Palermo Viejo, glamorous restaurants come and go within a week, but this spacious destination, housed in a converted manor, has stood the test of time (and economic crisis).

Don’t expect the same tasty pies from this porteño pizzeria’s Ezeiza location. The Italian menu here is basic, with classic sandwiches (ham and cheese; tomato, basil, and mozzarella, etc.) and overpriced salads. It is also a full coffee shop, with espresso, lattes, and pastries.

Tucked behind the Four Seasons hotel is La Mansion, an 88-year-old Belle Époque mansion built by Felix Alzaga Unzué as a wedding gift for his wife. Four Seasons dropped $1 million on a restoration of the regal building’s frescoes, marble, and 24-karat-gold-trimmed wood paneling.

There’s no menu—you just sit down and they bring you food, like ensalada de pulpo. If you see something going by that you like, you just ask for half of it.

A classic, consistent, tried and true parrilla that ranks among the city’s best.

Lost in a time warp amid Palermo’s trendy spots, this classic has retained its original grocery. Eat in the back room with red-checked tablecloths where a mix of old-timers and barrio hipsters order the signature fabada (Spanish bean-and-sausage casserole).

Bringing the gaucho tradition to La Boca, famed pampa chef Francis Mallman set up his grill at this renovated Italianate town house not far from the brightly painted houses and tango dances on Caminito.