Argentina

Restaurants in Argentina

You could spend weeks eating at in restaurants in Argentina and never tire of the great local beef—whether it’s a thick steak or a beef-filled empanada —paired with a full-bodied local Malbec. The landscape of restaurants in Argentina is a result of the rustic and simple cuisine of the indigenous Gauchos and Argentinian people, as well as a mix of French, Italian and Spanish influences. For a taste of rugged Argentinian culture, try the classic spot Estilo Campo in the Puerto Madero area of Buenos Aires. Waiters recreate an Argentinian cowboy culture, dressed in the uniform of Gauchos, and serving up sturdy steakhouse cuisine—plenty of beef, as well as pork loin, venison and wild boar.

Cumaná is a regional-style Argentina restaurant off Avenida Santa Fe in Buenos Aires and showcases hearty comfort foods such as empanadas, tamales-style humitas and cazuelas, stews made with meat, potatoes, squash, corn, eggplant and more. You may encounter a line, but the food and prices are worth it.1884 Francis Mallmann is the top spot to eat in Mendoza and one of the best restaurants in Argentina. It offers a celebrity chef dining experience, with an emphasis on beef (of course), as well as chivito (kid goat), in a rehabbed wine cellar.

This venue is closed.

This bustling lunchtime favorite among Porteños, who have been crowding the two level space since it first opened in another location in the 1940s.

Once a tailor shop, then a deli with a bar, this ur-bodegón is famous for its collection of old vermouth bottles, grilled sardines, and a wine-infused oxtail stew.

Tucked away in Recoleta, this rustic nook with red leatherette booths is home to the town’s best empanadas. Flash-baked to order, the pastries arrive blistered and plump with creamed corn, mozzarella and basil, or hand-chopped beef sweetened with onions.

This bright, colorful Spanish chain serves up some of the airport’s healthiest fast food.

Not more than a kick of a fútbol from the Boca Juniors stadium, and as brightly colored as a Caminito house, Il Mattarello is the gritty barrio’s best known Italian cantina.

Of the dozens of fine steak houses that line the picturesque docks of Puerto Madero, Las Lilas is arguably the best (and certainly the most famous: Jenna Bush reportedly dined here in 2007).

Dine on sirloin wrapped in boar with a Malbec wine sauce at this brick-walled restaurant.

Cocina criolla—northern Argentinean flavor—rules at this no-frills, dirt-cheap cult favorite across from the Parque Las Heras. The carne picante (spicy beef) empanada is the juiciest in town, and the carbonada stew teeming with pumpkin and corn spells comfort food.

An esplanade over the Río de la Plata makes this Italian restaurant one of the city's top dining experiences. Mushroom risotto and creamy gnocchi with ham are perfectly al dente.

Located in the Recoleta neighborhood, Cumaná serves both Argentine dishes and non-traditional fare like wood-fired pizzas. Lanterns and shelves of ornamental bottles decorate the bright, orange walls.

Persicco serves what’s often considered the best ice cream in Buenos Aires, so the new airport outpost of this Italian-style gelatería is a pre-departure must-do.

Dine on entrecôte and sip Malbec while dancers perform moves such as boleos and gaunchos at Esquina Carlos Gardel, the city's top dinner club—and one of Gardel's old haunts.