Argentina

Restaurants in Argentina

You could spend weeks eating at in restaurants in Argentina and never tire of the great local beef—whether it’s a thick steak or a beef-filled empanada —paired with a full-bodied local Malbec. The landscape of restaurants in Argentina is a result of the rustic and simple cuisine of the indigenous Gauchos and Argentinian people, as well as a mix of French, Italian and Spanish influences. For a taste of rugged Argentinian culture, try the classic spot Estilo Campo in the Puerto Madero area of Buenos Aires. Waiters recreate an Argentinian cowboy culture, dressed in the uniform of Gauchos, and serving up sturdy steakhouse cuisine—plenty of beef, as well as pork loin, venison and wild boar.

Cumaná is a regional-style Argentina restaurant off Avenida Santa Fe in Buenos Aires and showcases hearty comfort foods such as empanadas, tamales-style humitas and cazuelas, stews made with meat, potatoes, squash, corn, eggplant and more. You may encounter a line, but the food and prices are worth it.1884 Francis Mallmann is the top spot to eat in Mendoza and one of the best restaurants in Argentina. It offers a celebrity chef dining experience, with an emphasis on beef (of course), as well as chivito (kid goat), in a rehabbed wine cellar.

The oak-fueled ovens at Filo churn out wispy, chewy marvels in a nineties-kitsch space steps from Calle Florida. Long-haired diners nibble on elegant arugula-and-Parmesan salads while trying to decide among some three dozen toppings.

On a 19,500-acre ranch and vineyard about 15 minutes from Cachi, Sala de Payogasta serves updated regional dishes (fried goat cheese breaded in quinoa; barbecued lamb) in a landscape of lunar-like beauty.

The sommelier-owners pair mineral-rich Chardonnays and dense Argentinean Malbecs with local dishes such as skirt steak with quinoa and portobello mushrooms.

This 1954 stalwart on a hard-to-find street in La Boca serves up nostalgia alongside plump steaks, tortillas de papa, and shared tureens of homey soup. Yes, that is a photo of Bono and Francis Ford Coppola on the wall.

Don’t judge yet. This American chain is a different creature in Argentina, having added waiter service and a rather refined atmosphere to its offering of hamburgers and fries. Ezeiza’s new 4,300-square-foot outpost—open 24/7—also serves the only truly affordable fare in the airport.

One of the classic Buenos Aires pizza joints, El Cuartito started serving Argentina’s famous crusty pizzas in 1934.

Stuck in a late-Modernist time warp amid the Microcentro bustle, this 60’s café is for certain media and politico types an office, living room, and caffeine-emergency ward.

In a house dating from 1796 in Cachi’s tiny downtown, Restaurante Luna Cautiva offers house-made tapas and hosts peñas, nighttime folk-music shows.

Christina Sunae serves delicate pork dumplings and salads bursting with papaya and mango; save space for her green-tea ice cream.