Argentina

Restaurants in Argentina

You could spend weeks eating at in restaurants in Argentina and never tire of the great local beef—whether it’s a thick steak or a beef-filled empanada —paired with a full-bodied local Malbec. The landscape of restaurants in Argentina is a result of the rustic and simple cuisine of the indigenous Gauchos and Argentinian people, as well as a mix of French, Italian and Spanish influences. For a taste of rugged Argentinian culture, try the classic spot Estilo Campo in the Puerto Madero area of Buenos Aires. Waiters recreate an Argentinian cowboy culture, dressed in the uniform of Gauchos, and serving up sturdy steakhouse cuisine—plenty of beef, as well as pork loin, venison and wild boar.

Cumaná is a regional-style Argentina restaurant off Avenida Santa Fe in Buenos Aires and showcases hearty comfort foods such as empanadas, tamales-style humitas and cazuelas, stews made with meat, potatoes, squash, corn, eggplant and more. You may encounter a line, but the food and prices are worth it.1884 Francis Mallmann is the top spot to eat in Mendoza and one of the best restaurants in Argentina. It offers a celebrity chef dining experience, with an emphasis on beef (of course), as well as chivito (kid goat), in a rehabbed wine cellar.

This boisterous spot is known for grilled meats and fish.

In otherwise trendy Palermo Hollywood, this brightly lit parrilla is a no-frills affair. But the perfectly prepared bife de lomo (beef tenderloin) and matambrito (pork flank) and low prices keep it packed with locals.

The Scene: In steak-mad B.A., a fish- and veggie-focused supper club is a welcome dining option—even better that it’s in the cozy Chacarita neighborhood home of a 33-year-old vegan-leaning chef, Diego Felix, who enchants visitors with indigenous South American ingredients.

Since the restaurant’s revamp in 2009, politicos have returned for the modern takes on classic Porteño fare—mushroom-stuffed squid and tender suckling pig roasted in a clay oven—in the classic oak-paneled dining room.

Don’t expect the same tasty pies from this porteño pizzeria’s Ezeiza location. The Italian menu here is basic, with classic sandwiches (ham and cheese; tomato, basil, and mozzarella, etc.) and overpriced salads. It is also a full coffee shop, with espresso, lattes, and pastries.

Tucked behind the Four Seasons hotel is La Mansion, an 88-year-old Belle Époque mansion built by Felix Alzaga Unzué as a wedding gift for his wife. Four Seasons dropped $1 million on a restoration of the regal building’s frescoes, marble, and 24-karat-gold-trimmed wood paneling.

Bringing the gaucho tradition to La Boca, famed pampa chef Francis Mallman set up his grill at this renovated Italianate town house not far from the brightly painted houses and tango dances on Caminito.

The spare, sleek building, designed by three young Argentine architects, holds this airy, glass-walled café—open at night Thursdays through Saturdays—that’s perfect for a post-visit caipirinha or delicious dessert.  In warm weather, sit outside under a huge jacaranda tree and order the “Argentino

Chef Alejandro Digilio plays with foams and candied lacquering in his pint-size space.

Since its opening in 1866, the storied French Club has drawn generations of politicians and writers. While the city’s intelligentsia still congregates at the lobby bar, the upper floor was recently turned into a 28-room hotel filled with antiques and period furniture.