Argentina

Hotels in Argentina

In this diverse country, you’ll find luxurious hotels, rustic estancias (ranch lodges), global brand name hotels and all manner of B&Bs and hostels. Keep in mind that rates at Argentina hotels tend to be highest during the locals' peak vacation months: January, February and July. The Four Seasons Buenos Aires is an upscale Argentina hotel in the Recoleta section of Buenos Aires that has two distinct sections: a 12-story modern tower and a Belle Epoque style mansion with marble columns restored frescoes, gold leaf, and stained glass. Even if you don’t stay here, check out the sumptuous Sunday brunch.

Llao Llao Resort, a vast 1940 Patagonian lodge, is a historic monument, and the ultimate place to stay in Nahuel Huapi National Park. It’s set on a hilltop with gorgeous views of Lake Nahuel Huapi and smaller Lake Moreno, it’s great for hikers in the summer months and skiers in winter. The dining includes both French classics and Patagonian comfort food. You won’t be copping out by going for Park Hyatt Mendoza, the familiar brand-name hotel in the wine country city of Mendoza. The restored Spanish neoclassical hotel, with a colonial-era courtyard, sits conveniently on downtown's Plaza Independencia, and has both a great wine lounge, spa and views of the Andes.

Poised between the parks and gardens of Palermo and the historical sites of downtown Buenos Aires, upscale Recoleta is a great neighborhood for a family stay. At this no-frills Howard Johnson, up to two children under 12 stay free with their parents, buffet breakfast thrown in.

Any hotel that includes dulce de leche-filled alfajores and a bottle of Malbec in its welcome basket has clearly given some thought to intergenerational harmony and how to foster it.

Pulling out all the design stops with its rainbow facade and sleek interiors, this popular boutique is nonetheless a solid choice for families who want to stay in fashionable Palermo Viejo.

If you’ve stayed at a Four Seasons, you’ll know what to expect: peerless staff, including a bend-over-backwards concierge service, luxuriously equipped guestrooms, and top-notch shared amenities.

Few hotels anywhere have generated as much hype and debate over the past decade as this one.

Lodging emperors (Akihito), screen sirens (Sophia Loren), presidents (Nelson Mandela) and dodgy Swedish pop-rock duos (Roxette) since 1932, the Alvear is comfortably the city’s most famous hotel.

It’s the little things that count: The iPod-synced hydrotherapy massage tub; the temperature-controlled wine rack behind the damask sofa; the rooftop cognac and cigar bar. Housed in a handsome Recoleta mansion from 1912, this luxe boutique delivers a high-end experience with nonchalant aplomb.

If money is no object, the choice between the old mansion and the new tower is the proverbial no-brainer.

To create a theme hotel that isn’t lame is an achievement. To create one this special is a miracle. Each of the 11 guestrooms pays decorative homage to a famous Argentine, from Eva Perón to Che Guevara to Carlos Gardel.

A former convent overlooking one of Palermo Viejo’s sweetest street corners, Nuss is unpretentious, perfectly placed, and just plain good. Twenty-two guestrooms spread over three floors blend wood and fabrics to cozy effect, without stinting on the gadgetry du jour.

Recoleta’s best boutique hotel is a thing of rare beauty.

It tweets, it blogs, it posts, it pins, and it even updates its Google + account. In countless ways, the Fierro is achingly current. You would, therefore, expect it to fall flat on its face when it comes to doing the basic stuff right.

Owners Tom Rixton and Patricia O’Shea blazed a trail for others to follow when they opened Home a decade ago, but it’s hard to argue anyone has overtaken them.