Argentina

Hotels in Argentina

In this diverse country, you’ll find luxurious hotels, rustic estancias (ranch lodges), global brand name hotels and all manner of B&Bs and hostels. Keep in mind that rates at Argentina hotels tend to be highest during the locals' peak vacation months: January, February and July. The Four Seasons Buenos Aires is an upscale Argentina hotel in the Recoleta section of Buenos Aires that has two distinct sections: a 12-story modern tower and a Belle Epoque style mansion with marble columns restored frescoes, gold leaf, and stained glass. Even if you don’t stay here, check out the sumptuous Sunday brunch.

Llao Llao Resort, a vast 1940 Patagonian lodge, is a historic monument, and the ultimate place to stay in Nahuel Huapi National Park. It’s set on a hilltop with gorgeous views of Lake Nahuel Huapi and smaller Lake Moreno, it’s great for hikers in the summer months and skiers in winter. The dining includes both French classics and Patagonian comfort food. You won’t be copping out by going for Park Hyatt Mendoza, the familiar brand-name hotel in the wine country city of Mendoza. The restored Spanish neoclassical hotel, with a colonial-era courtyard, sits conveniently on downtown's Plaza Independencia, and has both a great wine lounge, spa and views of the Andes.

The space age hotel has soaring glass walls and views of neon-blue Lago Argentino.

El Ombú takes its name from the only tree indigenous to the pampas, one of which looms over the yard that separates the estancia's stables from the two main buildings.

A recently renovated historic home featuring a beautiful courtyard, sweeping views, and indigenous touches like algarrobo (black carob) ceilings. The hotel restaurant prepares gourmet salteña cuisine in a courtyard dominated by an aguaribay tree.

On one of B.A.’s busiest streets, this beautiful 1927 Art Deco hexagonal building could stand in for a Design Within Reach showroom, complete with Eames, Mies van der Rohe, and Le Corbusier pieces scattered about.

Built in the late 18th century, this former convent was the first boutique hotel in Argentina. Located in the Palermo Soho neighborhood, the hotel has 15 rooms with high ceilings, wood floors set against white linen, and lots of natural light.

This regal adobe building looks like a centuries-old Spanish Colonial hacienda.

Easily the city’s finest hotel, this whitewashed, seven-floor building has a restored Spanish neoclassical exterior, a colonial-era inner courtyard with gurgling fountain, a recently expanded gym and spa space, and a privileged position on downtown's Plaza Independencia.

Prodigal son Hernán Gipponi (who ran the restaurant at the Guggenheim Bilbao, in Spain) returns to his native Buenos Aires as head chef at the food-centric, 27-room hotel. Gipponi's menu is the highlight, but don't miss the killer wine cellar or the seventh-floor pool.

The hotel draws on the Belle Époque theme of tango's heyday, with Art Nouveau furniture and antique Victrolas. At the gift shop, buy a pair of Madreselva's sexy tango shoes, then join the hotel's free nightly dance class.

Héctor Villalba, a tango legend, restored and transformed this 100-year-old San Telmo mansion into a tango-themed boutique hotel and academy.

This Park Hyatt feels like two hotels in one. The original 23-room mansion, built in 1934 by French architect Leon Dourge, defines Belle Époque elegance with elaborate ironwork, glass chandeliers, and Persian rugs.

While Patagonia—the 304,000 square miles of electric-blue lakes, endless steppes, and spiky peaks that span lower South America—remains largely unspoiled, the region is undergoing a full-scale development boom.