Argentina

Hotels in Argentina

In this diverse country, you’ll find luxurious hotels, rustic estancias (ranch lodges), global brand name hotels and all manner of B&Bs and hostels. Keep in mind that rates at Argentina hotels tend to be highest during the locals' peak vacation months: January, February and July. The Four Seasons Buenos Aires is an upscale Argentina hotel in the Recoleta section of Buenos Aires that has two distinct sections: a 12-story modern tower and a Belle Epoque style mansion with marble columns restored frescoes, gold leaf, and stained glass. Even if you don’t stay here, check out the sumptuous Sunday brunch.

Llao Llao Resort, a vast 1940 Patagonian lodge, is a historic monument, and the ultimate place to stay in Nahuel Huapi National Park. It’s set on a hilltop with gorgeous views of Lake Nahuel Huapi and smaller Lake Moreno, it’s great for hikers in the summer months and skiers in winter. The dining includes both French classics and Patagonian comfort food. You won’t be copping out by going for Park Hyatt Mendoza, the familiar brand-name hotel in the wine country city of Mendoza. The restored Spanish neoclassical hotel, with a colonial-era courtyard, sits conveniently on downtown's Plaza Independencia, and has both a great wine lounge, spa and views of the Andes.

Ever since it opened in 2003, this tiny hotel in the historic, hostel-heavy San Telmo neighborhood has been crazily popular. Each of the five rooms in the restored Art Nouveau townhouse is uniquely decorated, from the conversation pit and groovy white modernism of No.

The first true urban boutique hotel in Recoleta when it opened in 1999, Design Suites now has locations in Calafate, Salta, and Bariloche.

Ancient eucalyptus trees flank a long and stately drive leading to the family-run estancia, 15 minutes outside Salta in Argentina’s subtropical northwest.

El Chaltén, a dusty speck of a town situated in an unusually beautiful spot beneath the granite spires of Cerro Fitz Roy and Cerro Torre, has hardscrabble charm: until recently, there were few lodging options for those not willing to camp out or share a bathroom.

This vast 1940 Patagonian lodge is a historic monument—and an ideal base for an Andean adventure.

The space age hotel has soaring glass walls and views of neon-blue Lago Argentino.

El Ombú takes its name from the only tree indigenous to the pampas, one of which looms over the yard that separates the estancia's stables from the two main buildings.

This regal adobe building looks like a centuries-old Spanish Colonial hacienda.

Easily the city’s finest hotel, this whitewashed, seven-floor building has a restored Spanish neoclassical exterior, a colonial-era inner courtyard with gurgling fountain, a recently expanded gym and spa space, and a privileged position on downtown's Plaza Independencia.

Prodigal son Hernán Gipponi (who ran the restaurant at the Guggenheim Bilbao, in Spain) returns to his native Buenos Aires as head chef at the food-centric, 27-room hotel. Gipponi's menu is the highlight, but don't miss the killer wine cellar or the seventh-floor pool.

While Patagonia—the 304,000 square miles of electric-blue lakes, endless steppes, and spiky peaks that span lower South America—remains largely unspoiled, the region is undergoing a full-scale development boom.

175 rooms and a marble-clad lobby, on a quiet downtown side street. 

The rurual retreat recently added 22 country-chic suites with queen-size beds, traditional Pampas art, oversize whirlpool tubs, and views of the two-acre laguna from their spacious balconies.