Argentina

Hotels in Argentina

When guests step into the soaring, black-and-white tiled lobby of this landmark Neoclassical high-rise (built in 1929, it was the city’s first skyscraper), they’re greeted with the fragrance of verbena—the first of many small details that make stays here memorable.

Located in the Ongamira Valley in the province of Córdoba, the Dos Lunas Horse Riding Lodge is a boutique hotel housed inside a century=old farmhouse.

If your Argentine fantasy includes polo mallets, saddlebags, and other equestrian accoutrements, look no further than this patrician hotel in the calm northern reaches of Palermo Viejo, an area recently dubbed Palermo Soho.

A 500-acre estate and spa in Argentine Patagonia. Guests ride horses around the lake then return for a traditional barbecue.

Recommended by Karen Benson, one of T+L's 2010 A-List travel agents.

This vast 1940 Patagonian lodge is a historic monument—and an ideal base for an Andean adventure.

The space age hotel has soaring glass walls and views of neon-blue Lago Argentino.

El Ombú takes its name from the only tree indigenous to the pampas, one of which looms over the yard that separates the estancia's stables from the two main buildings.

A recently renovated historic home featuring a beautiful courtyard, sweeping views, and indigenous touches like algarrobo (black carob) ceilings. The hotel restaurant prepares gourmet salteña cuisine in a courtyard dominated by an aguaribay tree.

On one of B.A.’s busiest streets, this beautiful 1927 Art Deco hexagonal building could stand in for a Design Within Reach showroom, complete with Eames, Mies van der Rohe, and Le Corbusier pieces scattered about.

Built in the late 18th century, this former convent was the first boutique hotel in Argentina. Located in the Palermo Soho neighborhood, the hotel has 15 rooms with high ceilings, wood floors set against white linen, and lots of natural light.

This regal adobe building looks like a centuries-old Spanish Colonial hacienda.

Easily the city’s finest hotel, this whitewashed, seven-floor building has a restored Spanish neoclassical exterior, a colonial-era inner courtyard with gurgling fountain, a recently expanded gym and spa space, and a privileged position on downtown's Plaza Independencia.

Prodigal son Hernán Gipponi (who ran the restaurant at the Guggenheim Bilbao, in Spain) returns to his native Buenos Aires as head chef at the food-centric, 27-room hotel. Gipponi's menu is the highlight, but don't miss the killer wine cellar or the seventh-floor pool.