Argentina

Hotels in Argentina

In this diverse country, you’ll find luxurious hotels, rustic estancias (ranch lodges), global brand name hotels and all manner of B&Bs and hostels. Keep in mind that rates at Argentina hotels tend to be highest during the locals' peak vacation months: January, February and July. The Four Seasons Buenos Aires is an upscale Argentina hotel in the Recoleta section of Buenos Aires that has two distinct sections: a 12-story modern tower and a Belle Epoque style mansion with marble columns restored frescoes, gold leaf, and stained glass. Even if you don’t stay here, check out the sumptuous Sunday brunch.

Llao Llao Resort, a vast 1940 Patagonian lodge, is a historic monument, and the ultimate place to stay in Nahuel Huapi National Park. It’s set on a hilltop with gorgeous views of Lake Nahuel Huapi and smaller Lake Moreno, it’s great for hikers in the summer months and skiers in winter. The dining includes both French classics and Patagonian comfort food. You won’t be copping out by going for Park Hyatt Mendoza, the familiar brand-name hotel in the wine country city of Mendoza. The restored Spanish neoclassical hotel, with a colonial-era courtyard, sits conveniently on downtown's Plaza Independencia, and has both a great wine lounge, spa and views of the Andes.

This Buenos Aires–based outfit has 20 villas and penthouses in Uruguay, Brazil, Argentina, Guatemala, and the Galápagos. Prior to guests’ arrival, properties are stocked with food, champagne, and fresh flowers.

Past and present coexist with remarkable grace in Buenos Aires; for evidence, one need only book a room at the Krista.

Located in the Monserrat neighborhood, the NH City & Tower hotel is housed in an Art Deco building, just a just a two-minute walk from Plaza de Mayo. Inside, the spacious lobby contains a white marble floor, large white columns, and a high ceiling with stained-glass insets.

At this ultramodern Patagonian wine resort in Argentina’s western Neuquén province, the 18 rooms with balconies overlook Malbec vineyards, and at the bar, wines by the glass complement tablas of local cheeses and meats.

175 rooms and a marble-clad lobby, on a quiet downtown side street. 

The rurual retreat recently added 22 country-chic suites with queen-size beds, traditional Pampas art, oversize whirlpool tubs, and views of the two-acre laguna from their spacious balconies.

Cavas Wine Lodge's contemporary casitas are a striking contrast to their surroundings: the property is set in the midst of a working vineyard accessible only by a dirt road. Walls are rounded like mushrooms, and provocative art fills the public spaces.

The Hotel: Occupying a stately, renovated, century-old townhouse, the Art Hotel lives up to its name: the grand, high-ceilinged ground floor (which has a cozy library lounge and breakfast area) does double duty as a gallery, and each of the 36 clean-lined, wood-floored rooms is d

Located in a Neoclassical building near the Borges Cultural Center, Esplendor has the vibe of a modern- art museum—note the floating staircase, crisp white walls, and massive portraits of Argentine icons (Che Guevara, Eva Perón) made of such unorthodox materials as cookies, bullets, and thread.

The self-described first boutique hotel in Buenos Aires, four-year-old Bo Bo—named in honor of American writer David Brooks’s coinage for “bourgeois bohemians”—launched the city’s design hotel boom and remains the purest expression of the form.

Ancient eucalyptus trees flank a long and stately drive leading to the
family-run estancia, 15 minutes outside Salta in Argentina’s subtropical
northwest. Four new guest quarters (three of them suites) recently

After tiring of their marketing jobs at Coca-Cola, Estela Títere and Silvina Tarrio bought this stately 1820s mansion—located in the historic neighborhood adjacent to San Telmo—from the descendants of the Italian Podestá family, who built and still lived in it.