Argentina

Hotels in Argentina

Cavas Wine Lodge's contemporary casitas are a striking contrast to their surroundings: the property is set in the midst of a working vineyard accessible only by a dirt road. Walls are rounded like mushrooms, and provocative art fills the public spaces.

The Hotel: Occupying a stately, renovated, century-old townhouse, the Art Hotel lives up to its name: the grand, high-ceilinged ground floor (which has a cozy library lounge and breakfast area) does double duty as a gallery, and each of the 36 clean-lined, wood-floored rooms is d

Located in a Neoclassical building near the Borges Cultural Center, Esplendor has the vibe of a modern- art museum—note the floating staircase, crisp white walls, and massive portraits of Argentine icons (Che Guevara, Eva Perón) made of such unorthodox materials as cookies, bullets, and thread.

The self-described first boutique hotel in Buenos Aires, four-year-old Bo Bo—named in honor of American writer David Brooks’s coinage for “bourgeois bohemians”—launched the city’s design hotel boom and remains the purest expression of the form.

Ancient eucalyptus trees flank a long and stately drive leading to the
family-run estancia, 15 minutes outside Salta in Argentina’s subtropical
northwest. Four new guest quarters (three of them suites) recently

A 2009 renovation of Buenos Aires’ Algodon Mansion, in the city’s Recoleta neighborhood, upped the ante at the six-story Belle Époque gem. The New York-based owners of Algodon (also the forces behind the Mendoza-based Algodon Wine Estates) spared no expense.

After tiring of their marketing jobs at Coca-Cola, Estela Títere and Silvina Tarrio bought this stately 1820s mansion—located in the historic neighborhood adjacent to San Telmo—from the descendants of the Italian Podestá family, who built and still lived in it.

The hotel is part of the Vistalba winery, across from La Bourgogne restaurant.

Although the NH Latino is located in the business district, the hotel is also within walking distance of popular tourist destinations like the Obelisk, Plaza de Mayo, and the shops of Calle Florida.

Located in Puerto Madero, a newly developed neighborhood marked by glass-front buildings that line the Río de la Plata riverfront, this hotel is styled with an uncluttered lobby that is dotted with couches, each set on a carpeted island, and a ceiling-high screen backlit by soft violet light at n

The fluted façade of the loft-style hotel, located two blocks from the Casa Rosada, where Eva Perón gave her famous address, dates to the 1920's-when Argentina embraced Art Deco.