Argentina

Things to do in Argentina

How do you make any trip extra-memorable? Do, rather than just watch. There are great classic things to do in Argentina where you can taste and feel this country at its best. If you follow the life rule of Dance like no one is watching, you will find plenty of things to do in Argentina. In Buenos Aires—and especially in the San Telmo neighborhood—you can find milongas, or tango salons, offering lessons early in the evening, and afterward you can stand back and watch the veterans go at it. The Malbec grape is king in this part of the world, and exploring the local wine country, for many people, is one of the top things to do in Argentina. You’ll find a more relaxed (and cheaper) experience than you would in comparable areas in France or California, since wineries along the Caminos del Vino roads are typically free. And you get the gorgeous Andes scenery, as well as plenty of tour options. The 900-foot-wide Iguazú Falls is surrounded by in a subtropical jungle, and will spoil you for other waterfalls. You can trace its edges thanks to plenty of trails and walkways. Spring (September through November) is the prime time to see the falls, when they are the most robust.

In less-visited Caballito, locals have bargained with butchers and greengrocers for more than 100 years under these iron arcades.

center of Buenos Aires high society, beautiful Recoleta may boast more polished brass than Fifth Avenue. The neighborhood is full of upscale clothing and furniture—and prices.

The satisfying aroma of leather greets you as you enter Arandú, which is dedicated to handicrafts. Stock up on woven bracelets, suede hunting bags, needlepoint belts, and alpaca-silver picture frames. Burnished riding boots are remarkably underpriced at around $350.

Locals gather here for a glass after dinner.

It’s not surprising that Eva Perón is interred in the very heart of this neighborhood. Evita will always be remembered for, among other things, her elegant wardrobe.

Opened in 2001 as a sort of personal art museum of Argentine über–real estate developer Eduardo Costantini, MALBA—the Museo de Arte Latinoamericano de Buenos Aires—now plays a central role in Buenos Aires’s artistic and cultural life.

If you need to change money upon arrival, head to this national bank, which offers the best exchange rates in the airport (avoid the Global Exchange window outside Customs).

Perfect your own moves with renowned tanguero Carlos Copello at his movement school (classes from $3). You won't be an expert overnight, but you will be able to hold your own at any milonga in town.

Watching a live game of professional soccer—or, rather, fútbol—is perhaps the fastest way to the Argentine psyche. Getting into a game can also baffle and intimidate.

The park, established to protect a 50-acre grove of rare arrayán trees, is accessible only on foot, by bicycle, or by boat.

A hippie-chic home-and-fashion store selling filmy, embroidered dresses and Nakashima-reminiscent furniture wrought in native woods like lapacho and cohiue.

The outfitter runs two daily excursions to Perito Moreno Glacier that include a trek across the ice.

For foodie souvenirs, visit the new gourmet market in Recoleta.

Beautifully revamped, this once-derelict two-mile stretch of docks and warehouses is now lined with steak houses, nightclubs, and romantic arching streetlights.

The striking red-and-gold Baroque San Francisco Church was built in 1625.