Argentina

Argentina Travel Guide

From the urbane streets of Buenos Aires to the jungle by Iguaza Falls and the rugged terrain of Patagonia, Argentina travel offers a study in extremes—a perfectly poised balance between wilderness and sophistication. This South American country has seen its share of political and economic turmoil over the years, but the geography of the Argentina nicely mirrors the diversity of the cultures that populate it. When you visit Argentina you’ll find the “Paris of South America,” Buenos Aires, as well as a tranquil coastline, the exquisite (but unforgiving) beauty of the snow-capped Andes Mountains and the rich wine country of Mendoza. Read on in this Argentina travel guide to embark on a rich South American vacation:

Things Not to Miss in Argentina

• Trying your hand (or feet) at the tango
 • Standing in the Playa de Mayo in Buenos Aires
 • Wandering the cobblestoned streets of San Telmo in Buenos Aires
 • Seeing the Iguazu Falls
 • Sampling a local Malbec, perhaps at one of the local parrillas, or steak houses
 • Sitting in the stands for a futbol match
 • Driving through the Lake District
 • Explore Cordova, a university town with Colonial architecture

When to Go to Argentina

The best time to travel to Argentina depends on where you want to focus your trip. Some factors to consider: Summer, December through February, is the best time to visit the extreme landscape of Patagonia. You’ll find fewer crowds in Buenos Aires during the summer, but it can get hot, too. The prime time to visit Buenos Aires is in the spring (September through November), when the temperatures are cool and the purple jacarandas are in bloom. A great time to see Mendoza or the Lake District is in the fall, when the foliage pops—and there are fewer crowds.

Articles about Argentina

Sure, Mendoza boasts hundreds of wineries and, yes, it’s one of the world’s best wine destinations. But even the most famous labels can get a little dull sometimes. Here to liven up the wine world are three Mendoza wineries that are mixing things ...
New York restaurants can be cramped, but probably not quite this cramped. At El Papagayo in Argentina, there’s not much elbow room because the entire restaurant is built into an alley. Architect Ernesto Bedmar bought the land, which he refers t...
New York restaurants can be cramped, but probably not quite this cramped. At El Papagayo in Argentina, there’s not much elbow room because the entire restaurant is built into an alley. Architect Ernesto Bedmar bought the land, which he refers t...
Tango-lovers, take note: today marks the return of Tango Buenos Aires, billed as the world’s largest tango festival, running through August 27 in Argentina’s capital. This annual celebration of the hypnotic South American partner dance features hu...
Shot over the span of six weeks, Timestorm Films put together a timelapse featuring some ridiculously stunning scenes of weather rolling right over the Chilean landscape. The team traveled more than 4,660 miles and took 100,000 still images to com...
Three years in the making, Los Fuegos will be a part of the much-anticipated Faena Hotel project and will open in November. (The other restaurant is from Austin-based chef Paul Qui.) As its name suggests, Los Fuegos will be all about fire. The ...
Sophie Lloyd founded Shop Hop in 2010, the same year she moved to Buenos Aires. The fashion writer, editor and stylist-turned-personal-shopper now spends her time exploring the city’s ever-changing fashion scene and discovering new local designers...
Travel south in Argentina and the place names begin to change. The letters l, w, and y creep in alongside Spanish syllables: Puerto Madryn, Trelew, Trevelin, Gaiman. Vowels masquerade as consonants. This region of Patagonia, the Chubut province, i...
Travel south in Argentina and the place names begin to change. The letters l, w, and y creep in alongside Spanish syllables: Puerto Madryn, Trelew, Trevelin, Gaiman. Vowels masquerade as consonants. This region of Patagonia, the Chubut province, i...
Argentina’s economy is, at least for now, in a state of chaos, with inflation increasing exponentially. Many travelers who arrive there are mystified by a common Argentine practice: exchanging money at the “blue” rate (translation: on the black ma...