Amsterdam

Amsterdam Travel Guide

Sky

This modest boutique in Amsterdam’s Nine Streets shopping district is a favorite among the city’s stylists, makeup artists, and models.

"Welcome" is posted in five different languages above the tall windows of this canal-side store, selling furniture and home accessories in a large, gallery setting.

Stationed within the Dylan Hotel, this elegant, brasserie-style bar is a popular spot for lunch, dinner, and business meetings over cocktails. The space includes both the fireside Bar Badou and a lounge with comfortable, low profile furniture.

Tulip bulbs, seeds, and cut daffodils, roses, lilies, and more are for sale at this shop. Ask the shopkeeper for bulbs that are certified to pass U.S. Customs. Even if you don’t buy, a stroll through the urban garden atmosphere is worthwhile.

Long flights take their toll on adults, much less children, so this free playground (designed for ages three to nine) in the Amsterdam Airport Schiphol is a welcome sight.

One of Europe’s great art museums, the red-brick, neo-Gothic national art museum devotes 14 rooms to more than 400 Dutch masterpieces from the country’s golden age like Night Watch by Rembrandt, Vermeer’s Kitchen Maid, and Jan Steen’s Feast of St. Nicholas.

With the exception of making it on the guest list, the doorman’s favor is necessary to enter this top-of-the-line lounge and nightclub off the Leidseplein, Amsterdam’s version of Times Square.

This shop/gallery hybrid on the ground floor of a three-story brick building near Amsterdam’s Dam Square stocks vintage plywood furniture from the 1940's, 1950's, and 1960's. Pieces include a refinished red Eames chair, a beech bookshelf from W.

Don the walking shoes, pack a camera, and line up behind a guide to ascend the country’s most sky-scraping church tower. A symbol of Amsterdam, the "Dom Tower" is 369 feet tall and the highest accessible viewpoint is at the 312-foot mark.

A dose of peace and quiet can be found in the airport’s silent oasis, decorated with stained-glass windows and dedicated to meditation and prayer. Complimentary religious texts are available in several languages, and with advance notice, groups can organize communal services.

Since the late 19th Century, shoppers looking for fine Dutch porcelain have been drawn to this three-story canal house in the Munttoren area.

This floating flower market is always filled with people, who come for the experience, colors, and fragrances, even if shopping isn’t on the agenda.

The mission of Laura Dols old-timey boutique in the Nine Streets shopping district of Amsterdam is to unearth the world’s best vintage clothing and give it new life.

Droog sells functional, everyday household items with unusual designs—including accessories, lighting, furniture and studio work—all of which aim to create a "new design integrity." At its colorful, gallery-like showroom in Amsterdam’s Red Light district, a variety of household goods from produce

High atop the temporary HQ of the Stedelijk Museum, in the edgy eastern docklands, sits this anomaly of dining and entertainment: occupying a full floor of a vast warehouse building, it has the merest hint of décor (some cheery yellow-green paint here and there, long picnic tables).