Amsterdam

Amsterdam Travel Guide

Amsterdam is a pedestrian-friendly city, but it'd be a shame not to explore it as the locals do - by bicycle. Rent a bike from AmsterBike and pedal around yourself, or take a guided tour. (If you'd rather not bike, you can get a great overview of the city on a canal cruise). Here are some other classic things to do in Amsterdam:
Visit the Van Gogh Museum. Housing the art collection of Vincent Van Gogh's younger brother, Theo, this museum includes around 200 paintings and 500 drawings by Holland's native son, as well as by Van Gogh's friends and contemporaries. The paintings tell the story of Van Gogh's journey from Holland, where his work was dark and somber, to France, where he discovered vivid color.
Sightsee in the historic Begijnhof district. This classic example of Dutch architecture dates back to the 14th century. The neighborhood has a serene setting, with small houses and picturesque gardens surrounding tidy courtyards.
Stroll through Bijlmermeer. This neighborhood, once infamous for muggers and junkies, is now a booming area for innovative architecture, and is home to the shopping center Amsterdamse Poort.
Sunbathe in the Vondelpark. What to do in Amsterdam between museums and tours?This 120-acre park, located near the Rijksmuseum, has gorgeous lawns, paths, and an open-air theater, as well as a Picasso statue.

Built as a brewery in 1662, this nightclub on the Singel Canal in central Amsterdam served as a concert hall, cinema, and auction hall, all of which are noticeable in the exposed wood beams, ceiling paintings, carved stucco, and Greek columns.

Amsterdam’s museum of contemporary art dates back to 1895 and houses classic and contemporary art, including photography and design objects. Over the years, its collection and mission outgrew the original neo-Renaissance-style brick building.

This whitewash-and-brick building at Rozengracht and Marnixstraat sports a tall, skinny sign with “Sound Garden” in vertical letters, colorful spray-painted wall art, and beer signs.

Explore the world of the macabre and marvel at the horrendous means of ancient punishment at this museum, housed in a small, dungeon-esque building where the gruesome, working instruments are on full display.

Move over, Las Vegas—the Schiphol Airport may be the new destination wedding location of choice. The airport’s wedding planner Marc Eijkens puts together packages, each with different ceremony locations.

Though Abraham Tuschinski was killed along with his family at Auschwitz, his spectacular cinema in Amsterdam survived and remains the largest in the Netherlands. Today, it’s the extravagant mix of Art Deco, Art Nouveau, Moorish, and Oriental styles throughout the theater that ensures its fame.

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This modest boutique in Amsterdam’s Nine Streets shopping district is a favorite among the city’s stylists, makeup artists, and models.

"Welcome" is posted in five different languages above the tall windows of this canal-side store, selling furniture and home accessories in a large, gallery setting.

Stationed within the Dylan Hotel, this elegant, brasserie-style bar is a popular spot for lunch, dinner, and business meetings over cocktails. The space includes both the fireside Bar Badou and a lounge with comfortable, low profile furniture.

Tulip bulbs, seeds, and cut daffodils, roses, lilies, and more are for sale at this shop. Ask the shopkeeper for bulbs that are certified to pass U.S. Customs. Even if you don’t buy, a stroll through the urban garden atmosphere is worthwhile.

Long flights take their toll on adults, much less children, so this free playground (designed for ages three to nine) in the Amsterdam Airport Schiphol is a welcome sight.

One of Europe’s great art museums, the red-brick, neo-Gothic national art museum devotes 14 rooms to more than 400 Dutch masterpieces from the country’s golden age like Night Watch by Rembrandt, Vermeer’s Kitchen Maid, and Jan Steen’s Feast of St. Nicholas.

With the exception of making it on the guest list, the doorman’s favor is necessary to enter this top-of-the-line lounge and nightclub off the Leidseplein, Amsterdam’s version of Times Square.

This shop/gallery hybrid on the ground floor of a three-story brick building near Amsterdam’s Dam Square stocks vintage plywood furniture from the 1940's, 1950's, and 1960's. Pieces include a refinished red Eames chair, a beech bookshelf from W.

Don the walking shoes, pack a camera, and line up behind a guide to ascend the country’s most sky-scraping church tower. A symbol of Amsterdam, the "Dom Tower" is 369 feet tall and the highest accessible viewpoint is at the 312-foot mark.