Amsterdam

Restaurants in Amsterdam

Traditional Dutch cuisine is hearty, stick-to-your ribs fare like erwtensoep, a meaty pea soup, or simple meat dishes such as kip (chicken) and biefstuk (beefsteak). But given its European locale, plus its long history of global trade, Amsterdam restaurants also serve up a lot of international fare, as well as "New Amsterdam" farm-to-table cuisine. Here are some of our favorite restaurants in Amsterdam:
Bolenius: This restaurant by the city's World Trade Center serves up New Amsterdam cuisine -fresh, local fare using only seasonal ingredients and garnished with fresh herbs and vegetables grown in the restaurant's own garden. Try the risotto with cauliflower, ricotta and herring eggs, or the gooseberry crumble with brown butter.
Stamppotje: During most of the year, this small Amsterdam restaurant chain offers a classic Dutch dish: Stampot, which consists of mashed potatoes, carrots and onions mixed into a hearty stew. During summer, the name changes to IJscuypje, and the restaurant sells ice cream.
Hofje van Wijs: This legendary coffee and tea house dates back to 1792, and features a traditional Dutch menu with an assortment of spiced stews, alongside an excellent selection of scones and sweets.

Located in a sunny, coach house attached to the 17th-century Huize Frankendael manor on the outskirts of Amsterdam, Merkelbach infuses tradition into its often-changing, French-influenced menu designed by “slow food” devotee chef Geert Burema.

Grab a sandwich at this hip organic bakery.

Rated a Bib Gourmand (good value) restaurant by the Michelin Red Guide, Envy is a concept restaurant focused on small, creative dishes that are shared at the table. The stark interior includes a long row of elevated tables, lit by globed lamps hung from the ceiling, where diners have

Opened by the owners of the neighboring restaurant Envy, Vyne attracts oenophiles to its long, narrow, light oak bar with suede banquettes, behind which resides a vast collection of mostly European wines.

Situated in a converted greenhouse in Frankendael Park, De Kas is adjacent to a nursery and garden where much of its ingredients are grown. The elegant dining room has views of the open-plan kitchen, and is sheltered by a high, glass-pane ceiling.

White tablecloths and Mediterranean-blue china dress up this contemporary French restaurant, open for breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

Located on a square, this spacious place draws a largely local crowd with its modest pricing and easy-going, cafe environment. The interior is high-polished dark wood throughout, with a long bar and intimate tables. Sandwiches are the focus at lunch, and a small number of meat, fish,

Make up for a missed flight by sipping champagne (choose from 15 by-the-glass options) at this minimalist lounge with an impressive saltwater aquarium.

Less ornate than Pompadour's flagship tearoom at 12 Huidenstraat, this second, brick-front location sells elegant baked goods and pastries along with chocolate and light lunches.

Grand ceilings and windows, a curved, polished-wood bar, and Art Nouveau touches give Het Paleis a historic yet elegant ambience. If plane spotting is a hobby, a seat on the intimate terrace is highly recommended.

Located in a small alley by an Amstel canal, this elegant French restaurant reflects the English heritage and Japanese culinary training of its chef-owner, Jean Beddington.

Strong coffee and more than 40 types of Limburgse vlaai—buttery flanlike pastries—are served at this Dutch café. Traditional flavors like strawberry and rice pudding draw snack-craving crowds. Stop in, or order by phone for pickup before your flight.

Located inside The College Hotel, this restaurant, headed by Dutch native Chef Wilko Hoogendoorn, mixes international food with Dutch cuisine. The space that houses the restaurant is unique: it lived its former life as a 19th-century high school gymnasium.

Highly addictive oliebollen—deep-fried dough balls dusted with powdered sugar, akin to New Orleans’s famous beignets—are sold at wheeled wooden carts stationed throughout the airport during the autumn and winter.

This unpretentious restaurant is known for its slow approach to food, meaning each ingredient is prepared to order, making dinner a sometimes longer-than-expected experience. Chef and owner Wil Demandt frequents each table himself, explaining the multiple-course and a la carte menu options.