Amsterdam

Things to do in Amsterdam

Amsterdam is a pedestrian-friendly city, but it'd be a shame not to explore it as the locals do - by bicycle. Rent a bike from AmsterBike and pedal around yourself, or take a guided tour. (If you'd rather not bike, you can get a great overview of the city on a canal cruise). Here are some other classic things to do in Amsterdam:
Visit the Van Gogh Museum. Housing the art collection of Vincent Van Gogh's younger brother, Theo, this museum includes around 200 paintings and 500 drawings by Holland's native son, as well as by Van Gogh's friends and contemporaries. The paintings tell the story of Van Gogh's journey from Holland, where his work was dark and somber, to France, where he discovered vivid color.
Sightsee in the historic Begijnhof district. This classic example of Dutch architecture dates back to the 14th century. The neighborhood has a serene setting, with small houses and picturesque gardens surrounding tidy courtyards.
Stroll through Bijlmermeer. This neighborhood, once infamous for muggers and junkies, is now a booming area for innovative architecture, and is home to the shopping center Amsterdamse Poort.
Sunbathe in the Vondelpark. What to do in Amsterdam between museums and tours?This 120-acre park, located near the Rijksmuseum, has gorgeous lawns, paths, and an open-air theater, as well as a Picasso statue.

In the oldest part of Amsterdam, Staetshuys Antiquairs houses one of the world’s best collections of antique barometers, clocks, curios, and nautical and scientific instruments going back 300 years.

The bakery is filled with scrap-wood furniture of Piet Hein Eek. Come in for freshly baked breads, homemade cakes, and jars of jam.

When that airport magazine gets old, travelers visit this art museum annex, a partnership between the city’s museum of the same name and Schiphol.

Owned by antique dealer Hesdy Artist, this gallery sits just outside the historic Spiegelkwartier (Mirror Quarter), home to more than 70 fine art and antique shops.

Amsterdam began to reclaim the derelict 19th-century Western Gas Factory in the early 1990s, cleaning up pollution, laying out parks, and inviting entrepreneurs and artists to redevelop it.

Explore the world of the macabre and marvel at the horrendous means of ancient punishment at this museum, housed in a small, dungeon-esque building where the gruesome, working instruments are on full display.

Move over, Las Vegas—the Schiphol Airport may be the new destination wedding location of choice. The airport’s wedding planner Marc Eijkens puts together packages, each with different ceremony locations.

"Welcome" is posted in five different languages above the tall windows of this canal-side store, selling furniture and home accessories in a large, gallery setting.

One of Europe’s great art museums, the red-brick, neo-Gothic national art museum devotes 14 rooms to more than 400 Dutch masterpieces from the country’s golden age like Night Watch by Rembrandt, Vermeer’s Kitchen Maid, and Jan Steen’s Feast of St. Nicholas.

Since the late 19th Century, shoppers looking for fine Dutch porcelain have been drawn to this three-story canal house in the Munttoren area.

A dose of peace and quiet can be found in the airport’s silent oasis, decorated with stained-glass windows and dedicated to meditation and prayer. Complimentary religious texts are available in several languages, and with advance notice, groups can organize communal services.

Droog sells functional, everyday household items with unusual designs—including accessories, lighting, furniture and studio work—all of which aim to create a "new design integrity." At its colorful, gallery-like showroom in Amsterdam’s Red Light district, a variety of household goods from produce

Located in the west end of Amsterdam’s canal belt, the Anne Frank House is open for hour-long tours.

Although predominantly known for its cutting edge furniture and home decor, Anno Design also offers practical pieces that have wider, more cost-effective appeal.

The earth-toned lounge and treatment rooms with floor-to-ceiling windows overlooking the runways are Zen with a minimalist edge.