8th Arrondissement (Champs-Élysées)

Hotels in 8th Arrondissement (Champs-Élysées)

The historic Hôtel La Trémoille was built in 1883 and opened as a hotel in 1925. The hotel is situated in the 8th Arrondissement’s Golden Triangle, near the Champs-Elysées and the Avenue Montaigne.

The five-star Sofitel Le Faubourg is discreetly located next to the embassy and within walking distance of Musee d’Orsay and Palas Royal in the city's eighth arrondissment.

Built in 1928, the unapologetically luxe hotel was closed for two years and reopened in October 2010 after a monumental transformation by Philippe Starck, the 61-year-old designer responsible for placing an acoustic guitar in every room, not to mention a private screening room just off the lobby

Oh, Paris: your palace hotels are turning up the dial, each one-upping the other with refinements. And this grande dame?

This hip yet plush hangout between the Champs-Élysées and Eiffel Tower is as au courant as it was when it opened in 1911, thanks to a 2000 refurbishment courtesy of its new owner, the Sultan of Brunei.

Built around 1850 by famed city planner Baron Georges Haussman, this seven-story boutique hotel just a short walk from the Place de la Madeleine unites early 1900's charm with five-star amenities.

Pavillon des Lettres, hotel, Paris, France, author, literary

Voltaire once wrote, “God gave us the gift of life; it is up to us to give ourselves the gift of living well.” Paris’s 2010-opened Pavillon des Lettres takes this spirit to heart, and also pays homage to Voltaire himself, along with 25 other writers who were the inspiration for this chic hotel on

This Place de la Concorde landmark, built at the direction of King Louis XV in 1758, hasn’t lost its ornate air.

This quiet, romantic retreat may be only a five-minute walk from the towering chain stores—and the crowds that fill them—on the Champs-Élysées, but it gives the impression of a world apart.

In an unbeatable location near the Champs-Élysées, this majestic 1928 white-stone hotel redefined elegance when it reopened its doors as a Four Seasons in 1997. Today, it’s tops with couture-clad jet-setters and bons vivants seeking a hushed city retreat with all the modern conveniences.

Founded in 1907 by Englishman Lord Astor, the hotel underwent a British Regency renovation in 1996 (upholstered chairs with tall wooden legs, ornate nonworking fireplaces).

Sheltered behind the famous Avenue Montaigne, this family-owned three-story mansion excels at personalized service.

Renovated in 2007, this 23-room hotel takes its first name from Mathis, the adjacent bordello-chic lounge and restaurant, which is an institution among fashion and showbiz A-listers.

For all its refinement and pedigree, the latest hotel to arrive on the Avenue Marceau, in the Eighth Arrondissement, is not at all uptight.