7th Arrondissement

Restaurants in 7th Arrondissement

Live out the ultimate farm-to-table fantasy with a meal at chef Alain Passard's Michelin three-starred restaurant.

More affordable than the cutting-edge chef's flagship restaurant, Pierre Gagnaire's Gaya Rive Gauche is a fish house in Saint-Germain renovated in the minimalist style typical of high-end 21st-century eateries.

With a central location on Rue Cler, a popular, pedestrian-only market street, Café du Marché is a draw to locals and tourists alike.

More affordable than the cutting-edge chef's flagship restaurant, Pierre Gagnaire's Gaya Rive Gauche is a fish house in Saint-Germain with a minimalist style typical of high-end 21st-century eateries.

Located on the Left Bank near le Bon Marché department store, this busy wine bar was first established in the 1950's. The intimate, glass-enclosed space is furnished with an original zinc bar as well as ceramic tiles and vineyard-themed frescoes created by local artists.

Café Varenne is more like a convivial brasserie rather than a typical Parisian café.

Named for the small round iron and enamel pots in which dishes are both cooked and presented, the tiny Les Cocottes specializes in seasonal fare like crab and sucrine lettuce or shoulder of lamb confit with potatoes.

Much like the iconic landmarks nearby, Le Voltaire is a classic Paris bistro that stands the test of time in the chic 7eme arrondisement. Perhaps the restaurant’s riverfront location, emerald green awning, and shiny wood paneling outside gives rise to the high prices.

Forget convention: at this brainchild of a World’s Best Sommelier, you first pick your wine and then the chef composes something to fit your selection (taking your allergy to shellfish or aversion to mushrooms into consideration).

Situated in the Seventh Arrondissement, this small, lively bistro is often lauded as the best in Paris. Run by celebrated chef Stéphane Jego, the restaurant serves authentic Basque fare in a traditional bistro-style setting with closely packed tables and an open kitchen.

From its roost on the second platform of the Eiffel Tower, Le Jules Verne is helmed by Alain Ducasse (since 2007)—which means the food is truly worthy of its location.

Despite chef-owner Christian Constant’s rise to fame on the local culinary scene, his namesake restaurant remains rooted in the humble neighborhood café tradition.

Formerly the restaurant of the Hôtel d'Orsay, this Belle Èpoque dining room is much the same as it was when it first opened in 1900. Located on the first floor of the museum, the restaurant is adorned with crystal chandeliers, a frescoed ceiling, and tall arched windows overlooking the Seine.

This small Paris restaurant celebrates the flavors of jamón ibérico, a high-quality Spanish ham. This particular charcuterie is cured for up to 42 months, and Bellota-Bellota serves it alongside tapas and in sandwiches.