7th Arrondissement

Restaurants in 7th Arrondissement

This small Paris restaurant celebrates the flavors of jamón ibérico, a high-quality Spanish ham. This particular charcuterie is cured for up to 42 months, and Bellota-Bellota serves it alongside tapas and in sandwiches.

The frayed, yellowed menu posted in the window of Aux Fins Gourmet hints at the long history of this classic French bistro, located in the Seventh Arrondissement.

At Les Ombres is known for its close-up views of the Eiffel Tower, whose metal architecture the restaurant seems to mimic with its geometric, glass ceiling. Indeed, “Les Ombres” means “the shadows,” referring to those cast by the neighboring tower.

Presidents from across the globe, including Jacques Chirac, Bill Clinton, and Vladimir Putin, once dined at this traditional bistro in the Seventh Arrondissement, just a five-minute walk from Les Invalides.

Follow the advice of Julia Child and visit iconic patisserie Rollet Pradier. The stone building, with its large front windows filled with enticements, has been a part of the Seventh Arrondissement since 1859.

Everything about this sleek room in shades of café au lait suggests a serious restaurant, but the set-meal prices say bistro.

Live out the ultimate farm-to-table fantasy with a meal at chef Alain Passard's Michelin three-starred restaurant.

More affordable than the cutting-edge chef's flagship restaurant, Pierre Gagnaire's Gaya Rive Gauche is a fish house in Saint-Germain renovated in the minimalist style typical of high-end 21st-century eateries.

With a central location on Rue Cler, a popular, pedestrian-only market street, Café du Marché is a draw to locals and tourists alike.

More affordable than the cutting-edge chef's flagship restaurant, Pierre Gagnaire's Gaya Rive Gauche is a fish house in Saint-Germain with a minimalist style typical of high-end 21st-century eateries.

Located on the Left Bank near le Bon Marché department store, this busy wine bar was first established in the 1950's. The intimate, glass-enclosed space is furnished with an original zinc bar as well as ceramic tiles and vineyard-themed frescoes created by local artists.

Café Varenne is more like a convivial brasserie rather than a typical Parisian café.

Named for the small round iron and enamel pots in which dishes are both cooked and presented, the tiny Les Cocottes specializes in seasonal fare like crab and sucrine lettuce or shoulder of lamb confit with potatoes.