1st Arrondissement

Restaurants in 1st Arrondissement

Owned by Caroline Rostang, the daughter of French culinary giant Michel Rostang, L’Absinthe is best described as a New York-inspired French bistro. The restaurant nods to New York City with its urban chic design, highlighted by the oversized, antique clock on the ground floor.

Just blocks from the Louvre, Efisio Mannai's Fellini restaurant presents another grand human achievement: fine Italian cuisine.

Installed between Les Halles and Jardin du Palais Royal, La Cloche des Halles sits under a red awning on rue Coquillière. Tables line the sidewalk, while cozy banquettes and tiny wooden tables fill the interior space.

Few anticipated the Michelin Star this 20-seat restaurant near the Louvre would earn in 2009, just one year after opening. The space's rustic wood beams and stone walls suggest  simpilicty, but chef Adeline Grattard's menu is anything but.

A folksy bar des huîtres near the Opera House, with cheesy murals of Mont Saint-Michel and piped-in recordings of seagulls. Sophisticated it is not, and yet you'll rarely find Belons so pristine.

Flowery Art Nouveau wall tiles dialogue quietly with Guimard’s sensational verdigris entrance to the Châtelet Métro station, seen through windows daubed with leaves and clusters of grapes.

Situated within the tourist-site triumvirate of the Tuilieries, the Louvre, and the Palais Royal, Cibus offers upscale Italian dining in an atmosphere so warm and homey you'll find it hard to believe you're dining out. The interior space is tiny, seating no more than 16.

Located beside the old Paris Bourse, Café Moderne serves a reasonably priced menu of both classic and contemporary French cuisine to a largely local clientele, including lunchtime crowds of black-suited bankers.

Located in the Les Halles area, known as the belly of Paris, the establishment was built in 1880, based on the glass and iron buildings built by Victor Baltard.

Located on a quiet side street just off the Place des Victoires, this traditional wine bar and bistro is housed in a 17th-century stone building designed by renowned architect Jules Hardouin-Mansart.

Just around the corner from Palais Royal and the Louvre, Maceo has been a popular spot for over 30 years for prominent guests such as President Eisenhower. Eighteenth-century walls frame the elegant yet casual restaurant enhanced by large mirrors and deep leather armchairs.

Located below I.M. Pei’s iconic glass pyramid, this flagship of the Louvre restaurant complex serves an extensive menu of both traditional and contemporary French cuisine.

Just down from the Louvre on a Saint Honoré side-street, Le Garde Robe is an intimate wine bar and shop.

Essentially a hip neighborhood bar in the chic First Arrondissement, La Coupe d’Or is all about people watching from a sidewalk seat on one of the city’s most fashionable street corners. Located on Rue St.