18th Arrondissement (Pigalle)

Restaurants in 18th Arrondissement (Pigalle)

The French version of a mid-century American diner, Le Floors serves traditional greasy spoon fare as 1960’s soul and pop music plays in the background. Situated near the Cháteau Rouge Métro station, the café is housed in a three-story former print shop with a bowed glass-and-concrete facade.

Whether seated in the sunlight by the front windows, at the center room's bar, or beneath the back section's glass ceiling, diners find the red and gray decor and neo-bistro dishes reflected in Le Miroir's numerous framed mirrors (hence the name).

L’Olympic Café serves African-influenced fare in the energetic Goutte d’Or district, a multiethnic immigrant neighborhood also known as “Little Africa.” Housed in a 1930’s Art Deco building, the café has an upstairs dining area and a downstairs concert hall, both of which are designed with subdue

Situated in Montmarte, this old-fashioned café is best known as the restaurant where Amélie Poulain waits tables in the 2001 film Amélie. While a steady stream of movie fans continues to arrive each day, the café remains a modest neighborhood eatery with a largely local clientele.

On the north side of Montmartre down a Rue Custine side street, this off-the-beaten-path wine bar and bistro specializes in authentic, family-style French cuisine.

Popular with Monmartre locals, this cozy, low-lit cafe and bar in the Place du Tertre is known for its good-looking staff and sexy feel.

Located in a less-traveled section of Montmarte, this tiny café and bar caters to an almost exclusively local clientele.

Head to the base of Montmartre for a taste of Parisian nightlife. Michou, the legendary man behind this retro-styled drag show, has hosted audiences for more than 50 years. As expected, décor is campy (think dim red lighting, mirror covered walls, and glitter).

A fun spot to watch the natives drink and scarf down oysters, this neighborhood restaurant and bar in southern Monmartre has local color to spare. Opened the same year the Moulin Rouge and Eiffel Tower debuted (1889), La Mascotte features Art Deco decor and authentic Parisian cuisine.

The Senegalese specialties here have earned the restaurant a reputation as the best African fare in town.