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The Doctor Recommends: Must Reads for the Week Ending April 26, 2013

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There are two reasons to look at Brian Lam's Scuttlefish post about swimming with whale sharks off the coast of Isla Mujeres, Mexico. First, the photos, which are just beautiful. Second, his tutorial that explains how to take similar ones without fancy equipment. Warning: These pictures will make you very, very jealous. (Matt Haber)

Grantland presents Out in the Great Alone, a story about the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race by Brian Phillips. This is a massive story that you're going to want to spend some time with. If you get lost while reading it, don't worry: It comes with a convenient (and very smart) map of Alaska that shows you the locations at each point in the race. (M.H.)

Sure, animated gifs are now the default way to report news via repurposed Will Ferrell jokes, but photographer Nicolas Ritter's One is a much more subtle, artful use of the  ubiquitous image format. Striking photos of London are animated with just the tiniest hints of movement, making these images feel very alive. (M.H.)

Boston Magazine has released its May cover, which features hundreds of pairs of running shoes heartbreakingly arrayed with the simple cover line: We Will Finish the Race. Well done, Boston. (M.H.)

Frank Jacobs of Big Think presents a taco map of Mexico. (Ann Shields)

Dwell has a slideshow of some pretty dreamy modern bikes, including one of those Dutch bring-the-kids numbers and a polka dot SF ride. (A.S.)

The Associated Press: Travel: United, US Airways Raise Ticket Change Fees to $200 (Jennifer Flowers)

The Telegraph: Most Expensive Airport Transfers Revealed. (J.F.)

USA Today's Bill McGee takes a look back at the 10 most important changes in travel over the last 10 years. (Peter Schlesinger)

Good news for American ski bunnies, the fantasy of learning from a dreamy Norwegian instructor lives on! The Senate has pushed a provision into the immigration reform bill ensuring easy entry into the country for foreign ski teachers. From The Wall Street Journal (sub required) via New York's Margaret Hartmann. (Amy Farley)

Got a recommendation? Tell us in the comments.


Photo: iStock Photos.

Trip Doctor: How to Fill a Prescription Abroad

prescription medicine

Pharmaceutical regulations are different in each country, so getting a new supply of meds on foreign soil isn’t as simple as it sounds. First, visit the U.S. State Department website to ensure your pills are legal: narcotics, psychotropics, and stimulants are banned in some destinations. Next, you’ll usually have to get a local prescription (you’ll need to know both the generic name and dosage for your medication). To find an accredited, English-speaking physician, check with the local consulate or the International Association for Medical Assistance to Travellers, whose doctors often make house calls to hotels. Be sure to fill your prescription at a pharmacy recommended by the doctor or attached to a clinic or hospital—counterfeit drugs have become increasingly common abroad.

Amy FarleyHave a travel dilemma? Need some tips and remedies? Send your questions to news editor Amy Farley at tripdoctor@aexp.com. Follow @tltripdoctor on Twitter.

 

Photo © Andrew Brookes/Corbis

Tech Thursday: Ventev Rapid Two-Way Chargers

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We’ve all been there: only one outlet free in the airport terminal and you've got both a dead laptop and a dying phone. Or in the hotel, with one adapter and too many gadgets to charge.

Enter Ventev, whose tiny two-way wallport acts like a power strip for juice-hungry road warriors. It has one standard US electrical plug (a converter is still necessary abroad; we love this one) and two USB inputs at the bottom. They charge gadgets up particularly fast, and the eye-catching colors on the tangle-free connectors have us ditching our standard issue cables.

Nikki Ekstein is an Editorial Assistant at Travel + Leisure and part of the Trip Doctor news team. Find her at on Twitter at @nikkiekstein.

Photo courtesy of Ventev

Trip Doctor: How to Make a Tight Flight Connection

tight flight connection

Do...

Ask to be moved closer to the front of the cabin just before landing, so you can make a quick exit.

Run straight to the gate for your connection—even if it’s past your departure time.

Don’t...

Despair. A flight won’t wait for one passenger, but system-wide delays might result in a lucky break.

Book tight connections through large airports. Anything less than a 90-minute window is unrealistic.

Amy FarleyHave a travel dilemma? Need some tips and remedies? Send your questions to news editor Amy Farley at tripdoctor@aexp.com. Follow @tltripdoctor on Twitter.

 

Illustration by Paul Windle

Trip Doctor: Airbus Announces Wider Seats for Some, Narrow Seats for Most

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At last week’s Aircraft Interiors Expo in Hamburg, Airbus announced that it would soon offer airlines the option of extra-wide seats in coach on its A320 fleet. Good news? Debatable.

Yes, the aisle seats in the new configuration would be a spacious 20” wide (two inches wider than the current 18” seats). But to make room for the extra width, the middle and window seats would each shrink by an inch.

As Dominic Perry from Flight Daily News reported, the new configuration plans are based on airline, not passenger, feedback, and are meant to increase revenue, not comfort.

Airbus aircraft interiors marketing manager Stefanie Von Linstow explained at the Expo that airline feedback has shown preference for the aisle seat to be the widest. "Passengers in the window seat are already happy, and those in the centre seat might not be willing to pay as much for the extra width," Perry quotes her as saying.

Von Linstow admits that the new configuration is a response to what she politely labels a "growing population," and that it would be a "revenue-boosting solution that keeps a lot passengers happy."

No doubt, passengers paying a premium to be in an aisle seat would be content. As for the two-thirds of "growing" coach passengers sitting in the narrowing seats, it remains to be seen just how happy they'd be.

Photo credit: Reuters/Corbis

Trip Doctor: Foldable Carry-On Bag

carry-on bag

Q: I refuse to check bags. Can you recommend a favorite carry-on? —Kaito Tsunashima, via e-mail

A: If you can take only one suitcase, consider the new four-wheeled Biaggi Contempo roll-aboard ($219). It weighs just seven pounds and folds for easy storage (perfect for under your hotel bed). It’s not as roomy as checkable versions, but you can always have your clothes laundered by the hotel. A fresh feel is often well worth the nominal fee.

Mimi Lombardo Mimi Lombardo is Travel + Leisure's style director. Packing is rarely easy-we're here to help. Send your question to tripdoctor@aexp.com. Follow @TLTripDoctor on Twitter.

Photo by Sam Kaplan

Trip Doctor: Just How Clean is Your Hotel Bedspread?

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In the past few years, nearly all major hotel brands have phased out their polyester bedspreads in favor of duvets with easy-to-clean covers. Westin, Marriott, and Hilton, along with Four Seasons, Le Méridien, Ritz-Carlton, and St. Regis, all wash duvet covers between each stay. Some hotels simply use sheets to shield you from duvets. Make sure to sleep under the third sheet in these instances.

Amy FarleyHave a travel dilemma? Need some tips and remedies? Send your questions to news editor Amy Farley at tripdoctor@aexp.com. Follow @tltripdoctor on Twitter.

 

Photo © Louis Laurent Grandadam/Corbis

TripAdvisor Launches GreenLeaders, Just in Time for Earth Day

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How green is your getaway? To determine exactly how evironmentally responsible your destination is, TripAdvisor has lauched its GreenLeaders program. In the works for over a year, GreenLeaders rates green hotels and B&B’s on a scale of five levels, and broadcasts the exact details of what each of those properties is doing to operate on an energy budget.

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Trip Doctor Series: Cooking Schools (New Orleans)

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You could spend months exploring the rich culinary traditions of the Big Easy. Below, a program to whet your appetite. For more ideas, check out T+L’s April food issue’s Global Guide to Cooking Schools.

The School: Louisiana cookbook author Amy Cyrex-Sins runs the Langlois Culinary Crossroads program in New Orleans, offering half-day courses in a converted grocery store in the Faubourg-Marigny neighborhood.

The Class: If cornmeal waffles, pecan scones, and butter bean ragout are your thing, sign up for the Cajun and Creole Brunch, a three-hour morning class that focuses classic New Orleans breakfast dishes.

Jennifer FlowersJennifer Flowers is an Associate Editor at Travel + Leisure and part of the Trip Doctor news team. Find her on Twitter at @JennFlowers.

 

 

Photo by Anna Davis

The Doctor Recommends: Must Reads for the Week Ending April 19, 2013

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ABC News's Genevieve Shaw Brown gets the scoop on a new program called Pets Unstressing Passengers (PUP, for short), that brings therapy dogs to LAX to help ease the nerves of wary travelers. (Nikki Ekstein)

Want a discount at your favorite restaurant? Put away your phone! CNN Money's Erin Kim reports on phone-free dining. (N.E.)

Here's a fascinating interactive graphic from The New Yorker that breaks down the average income for residents surrounding each of the five boroughs' subway stops. (N.E.)

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