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RelayRides Launches New Car Delivery Service

RelayRides

While Airbnb.com has dominated travel headline news around the mushrooming peer-to-peer economy, another player in the P2P space has quietly been gaining ground, offering travelers a feel-good alternative to traditional car rentals. Launched in 2010, RelayRides today announces what could be a game-changing feature—convenient delivery of your selected car to your home, hotel, or airport.

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DART Brings Travelers Right to the Heart of Dallas

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Dallas/Fort Worth is the third busiest airport in the world (and larger than the island of Manhattan). It only makes sense that there’s now a way to easily travel from the hub into the city itself.

The Orange Line extension of DART (Dallas Area Rapid Transit) opened this week, and finally connects travelers and locals via light rail from Terminal A in DFW straight into downtown Dallas. This means visitors can access key destinations in the city, such as the popular Dallas Arts District and Fair Park, as well as large convention centers for business travel. The Terminal Link takes passengers between terminals within DFW, to get to or from Terminal A.

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Uber Introduces Cars for Families

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You've read the headlines: Uber is being valued at $18 billion. And as a mom of two toddlers living in New York, I think that sounds about right. Why, you ask? The popular car-sharing service just launched UberFamily, which means getting around the city just became a lot easier (anything to avoid a schlep on the subway). For a $10 surcharge, your vehicle will pick you up with fully-installed car seats. This is a major game-changer, especially for city parents without wheels, and the company plans to roll out to other US destinations later this year. For info on downloading the app, go here.

Daily Transporter: The World Cup Wired

beach soccer

Need to know where your FIFA World Cup seats are in relation to the nearest caipirinha vendor? Take a virtual tour of the twelve stadiums hosting this month’s soccer extravaganza thanks to Google Street View. Google has also beefed up its transit coverage in Brazil to help fans find the easiest routes to the goal.

See the World Cup in 25 Selfies You Have to Take This Year

Editor’s Picks: Brazil
Best Places to Travel This Year
Beautiful Beaches to Visit in 2014
World’s Coolest Tourist Attractions

Ann Shields is a senior digital editor at Travel + Leisure. You can find her on Twitter at @aegisnyc. Get the Daily Transporter newsletter in your in-box.

Photo: Robert Whitman

Alaska Airlines Invests in Seattle’s New Bike Share Program

201405-hd-alaska-airlines-seattle-bike-sharejpgBiking will meet air travel this September in Seattle, when the Pronto! Emerald City Cycle Share program launches with Alaska Airlines-branded wheels. The airline contributed $2.5 million to the program; in exchange, its name will appear on the first 500 green-and-blue bikes, which will initially be available in the U District, South Lake Union, Capitol Hill, and Downtown. The price structure is $8 for a 24-hour membership, $16 for three days, or $85 for a year, and every station will have a kiosk to rent or buy helmets.

Brooke Porter
Brooke Porter Katz is an Associate Editor at Travel + Leisure. Follow her on Twitter at @brookeporter1.

Photo courtesy of Pronto Cycle Share

China Considers High-Speed Railway to U.S.

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If a fear of international flights has long kept you from exploring China's Great Wall or visiting Xi’an’s famed terracotta soldiers, it's time to reconsider your boycott on traveling abroad—a high-speed railroad may soon connect Beijing to the United States.

The Bejing Times reports Chinese officials are currently in talks to construct an 8,000-mile railway connecting north-east China to the United States. The proposed route would cross Siberia, and then cut through Alaska and Canada before entering into the continental US. With trains traveling 220 miles per hour, it would take passengers approximately two days to complete the full trip.

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Lyft Leaps to 24 New Cities

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The rideshare service Lyft—which debuted last year exclusively in San Francisco—recently launched in 24 new markets. Now, the app connects the world’s largest network of on-demand rides with people who need a lift.

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Montreal's Airport Introduces New Security Checkpoint Reservation System

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Last month, the TSA debuted its first Precheck enrollment center at the Indianapolis Airport—with 300 more to open by spring—making an expedited security process more accessible than ever. Meanwhile, Canada’s Montreal-Pierre Elliott Trudeau International airport is testing another strategy to alleviate waits: a free, timed reservation system called SecurXpress. Here’s how it works: Enter your flight number and phone number on the airport website. Then, you’ll receive a text message, which acts as a ticket, with a reserved time for a specific SecurXpress checkpoint. Think of it like Disney’s FastPass. One text message is good for up to five people traveling together, and it’s up to you to get there on time. Unfortunately, the system only works on domestic and some international flights within Canada—but if it’s successful, maybe we’ll see it cross the border one day soon.

Brooke Porter
Brooke Porter is an Associate Editor at Travel + Leisure. Follow her on Twitter at @brookeporter1.

Photo Courtesy of Montreal-Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport

London Rolls Out New Parking Sensors—and App

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If you’ve ever gone around and around the block looking for a free spot, you know what a nightmare parking in the city can be. For the visitors and residents of Westminster, this takes an average of 15 minutes.

Fortunately, navigating London’s congested Westminster district just became much more simple—and high-tech.

Thanks to a successful trial of infrared sensors on five main thoroughfares, drivers can now use the ParkRight app on their smartphone to detect a vacant space as they approach their destination.

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Alternatives to New York’s Soon-To-Be-Banned Central Park Horse Carriages

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New York’s new mayor, Bill de Blasio, often bemoans a “tale of two cities”—one rich, one poor. But lately he has been lamenting a different kind of tail—the ones on the horses that for decades have pulled the iconic tourist carriages through Central Park. De Blasio plans to ban the horse-drawn hansoms because, like many New Yorkers, he thinks the horses are undernourished, mistreated, and overworked, not unlike your typical Manhattan freelance fact-checker. And so, to keep the tourists coming back to the Big Apple, here are my alternatives to the Central Park horse-drawn carriages.

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