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Fashion Watch: Our Favorite Women's Oxford Shoes

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The classic oxford is the women’s shoe of the moment—chic, timeless, and sturdy enough for the long haul (clockwise, from bottom left).

• Tricolor wing tip, $750, Robert Clergerie.
• Patent-leather brogue with rubber sole, $435, AGL.
• Leather and calf-hair wing tip, $660, Fratelli Rossetti.
• Two-tone goat-leather oxford, $560, Strenesse Gabriele Strehle.
• Polished-leather shoe, $790, Derek Lam.
• Monochrome leather oxford, $405, Longchamp.

Photo by Levi Brown

Retro Revival: The Moon Boot

The Moon Boot

One small step for man, one giant leap for ski bunnies.

From Montana to the Matterhorn, nothing says après-ski like the Moon Boot (tecnicausa.com; $100). The brainchild of the Italian brand Tecnica, the high-tech design became an instant slopeside classic when it debuted in 1970, inspired by Neil Armstrong’s padded lunar look. Today, some 28 million pairs later, its retro-fabulousness is back in vogue. The boot now comes in a range of patterns and colors—rainbow! iridescent gold!—and has adorned the feet of everyone from Sir Paul McCartney to Snooki, who no doubt loves the fact that there are no rights or lefts (easy on, easy off).

Photo © Levi Brown

How to Tie a Sarong

how to tie a sarong

Does your beach cover-up never seem to stay on? Designer Milo Migliavacca—whose batik-print silk wraps are sold at the Four Seasons Resort Bali at Jimbaran Bay—shows how to do it right.

1. Hold unfolded sarong behind your back, leaving excess fabric on left side. Fold right side to middle of waist.

2. Wrap left side across your waist, pulling up the right edge. Continue wrapping around the torso.

3. Switch grips, and tie ends together in a simple double knot at the right hip.

4. Tuck knot and ends into waist and smooth out. Sarong should hang flat and reach below ankles.

Marguerite A. Suozzi

Marguerite A. Suozzi is an associate research editor at Travel + Leisure.

 

Illustration by L-Dopa

The History of Ferragamo

Ferragamo shoe

A passion for shoemaking has turned this Italian brand into a lifestyle powerhouse that defines la dolce vita.

The Hotels: Salvatore Ferragamo’s son Leonardo runs the Lungarno Collection, including Hotel Lungarno in Florence; another son, Massimo, opened Tuscany’s Castiglion del Bosco.

The Clothes: Salvatore’s daughter Giovanna introduced ready-to-wear in 1965. Ferragamo’s Fall 2012 collection is by current creative director Massimiliano Giornetti.

The Stars: After opening a Hollywood shop in 1923, Salvatore Ferragamo became an A-list favorite.

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Street Scene: Bangkok

Bangkok, Thailand

Thailand’s large, bustling capital can be overwhelming—so who better than a few stylish locals to reveal where to go now?

Pim Sukhahuta, creative director of fashion label Sretsis: “I love going to Again & Again (Soi 4 Thonglor, Sukhumvit 55 Rd.) to look for fancy sequin tops, long prairie dresses, and 1950’s costume jewelry.”

Suraporn Lertwongpaitoon, curator and lecturer at Silpakorn University: “My favorite place to catch an art show and have a few drinks is WTF Café & Gallery. It’s very chic.”

Artaya Boonsoong, special effects supervisor at Renegade VFX: “At Roast Coffee & Eatery (Thonglor Soi 13, Sukhumvit 55 Rd.), I always order an iced latte and the Cuban sandwich.”

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Fashion Documentary Shows the World as a Runway

When Diana Vreeland was making her first forays into her career as a fashion editor, she wrote her dear readers the now oft-quoted suggestion, “Why don't you paint a map of the world on all four walls of your boys' nursery so they won't grow up with a provincial point of view?” All things considered, this was one of her more realistic tips, as compared to her enquiring why we don’t wear violet velvet mittens with everything or rinse our children’s hair in dead champagne.

In “Diana Vreeland: The Eye Has to Travel,” a fashion documentary in theaters today, Sept. 21, Ms. Vreeland’s ascendance from middle-school dropout to the most iconic fashion editor to date is largely attributed to her extravagant global vision. Never one to be confined, Ms. Vreeland saw no reason not to use the world as a catwalk and spearheaded legendary shoots, such as the 26-page spread of a fur-swaddled Veruschka scaling the mountains of Japan with a seven foot tall sumo wrestler. No one reads magazines just to see their own backyard, so why not blast them with images of France? Egypt? Or—her personal favorite—Russia?

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Tech Thursday: Chic New Bags for Your Camera

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Finding a good camera bag that is both functional and stylish is a seemingly near-impossible feat, at least in my findings. They’re always bulky, vinyl, sacks, with nothing new or fashionable brought to the table. Yeah, I get it: its primary purpose is to organize and protect your camera and accessories, but why does it have to be so dull? I like a little flare, okay?

So I was pretty excited when I saw the newest line of Acme Made camera bags, which just hit the market this earlier this week. They’re functional, good-looking bags, and come in four different sizes, depending on how much equipment you’ll be carting around with you. You can buy them in olive green and grey, but I’m partial to the grey one, which has a brushed nickel look to it, and a delightfully surprising burst of lime green on the inside. The internal compartments are adjustable and/or collapsible, so you can customize it to suit your needs.

www.acmemade.com; from $29.99.

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Joshua Pramis is the social media editor and resident tech aficionado at Travel + Leisure. Follow him on Twitter: @joshuapramis

Linda Fargo's Travel Uniform

Linda Fargo

The woman who gives Bergdorf Goodman its distinctive flair shares her on-the-road routine.

“If I don’t look right, then I just don’t feel right,” says Linda Fargo, senior vice president of women’s fashion, store design, and presentation at New York City’s iconic department store. Which is why she packs more than she needs for her jaunts to European runway shows and vacations on the Italian Riviera. One tip: she packs clothes on hangers in plastic dry-cleaning bags inside her large T. Anthonycase. “Almost nothing gets wrinkled,” she swears.

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Lady Gaga Opens Philip Treacy Show in London

Just before she kicked off the Philip Treacy show wearing a hot pink burka, Lady Gaga turned to the models backstage and slyly asked, "Any tips?" And then out came the pop diva to sing the praises of this designer's unique vision as hyper-tall women in wearable art bounced through the Gothic hall at the Royal Courts of Justice in London during Fashion Week.

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Opulence 101: Lessons from Fashion Designers

Van Cleef & Arpels sapphire clip

Two venerable French institutions are pulling back the curtains to reveal the craftsmanship behind their stylish goods. L’Ecole Van Cleef & Arpels (from $750) offers four-hour classes on jewelry history and design in a gilded 18th-century atelier on Paris’s Place Vendôme. Students can try on a few sparklers, too. Stateside, Hermès is hosting the Festival des Metiers, a traveling exhibition making stops in New York, San Francisco, and Houston this fall. Visitors can interact with artisans sewing supple leather into Kelly bags using techniques first developed in the 1930’s. Sadly, you don’t get extra credit for shopping.

Photo courtesy of L’Ecole Van Cleef & Arpels

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