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Is it Rude to ask Someone to Quiet a Child on a Plane?

child crying on airplane

A: If the child is an infant, try to be sympathetic. Intervening won’t help, but some earplugs might. When an older child is misbehaving (kicking the back of your seat, for example), then go ahead. Usually, talking directly to the parent—or even the child—will do the trick. If the problem persists, you should involve a flight attendant to keep the situation from escalating.

37: The percentage of passengers who would prefer to sit next to a smelly adult than a crying baby.

Source: Harris Interactive

Melanie Lieberman is the Editorial Projects Assistant and a member of the Trip Doctor News Team. You can follow her on twitter at @LittleWordBites.

Illustration © Images.com/Corbis

100 Ways to Travel Better Twitter Chat on Wednesday, December 4th

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How do you travel better? We're asking a panel of experts to open their little black books for hotel tips and air travel tricks this Wednesday, December 4th from 2-3pm EDT.

Ask our panel of insiders for their expert advice and money-saving tips (like bringing your own water!) during our chat.

The Host:

Amy Farley, News Editor, @TLTripDoctor

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Streamlining Hotel Check-Ins for Business Travelers

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After a long day traveling, the last thing any road warrior wants is to wait at a hotel check-in desk.

Don’t fret, frequent travelers: hotels have heard our pleas and help is on the way. New technologies promise to let guests skip the front desk, although it might take several years for all of us to reap the benefits.

Let’s start with the problem.

I still have bad flashbacks to a business trip to Florida several years ago. I arrived at the hotel late at night thanks to a flight delay, only to find a front-desk clerk who wanted to make small talk. Lots of small talk. Call me heartless, but all I wanted to do was go to bed. I’m sure the rest of my stay was fine, but all I recall of that hotel today was the overly friendly welcome.

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Q+A with Julian Breitenecker, Founder and CEO of Locca

Julian Breitenecker

Based in Vienna, Austria, Julian Breitenecker is the founder and CEO of Locca, a technology company that launched LoccaMini, the world’s smallest GPS tracking device. Ideal for checked and carry-on luggage, the 1.7-inch gadget has a 30-day battery life, it’s waterproof and shockproof, and it’s loaded with features such as a motion detector and audio responder that can be managed from your smart phone, tablet or desktop.

Below, Breitenecker, who often jet sets to tech summits in cities like Dublin and Cologne, Germany, tells us more about Locca—and shares his top travel tips.

Q: What inspired you to create the LoccaMini?

A:My motivation wasn’t actually business-based. I was traveling in Tel Aviv and lost my two-year-old son for a few terrifying minutes. I thought about creating a device that could keep track my child’s whereabouts and soon realized it could easily apply to important belongings as well. Locating luggage is one of the most popular uses.

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Best New Walking Tour Apps

Walking Apps

Love exploring cities on your own two feet? These mobile services—each vetted by T+L—put the guide right in your pocket, giving you local expertise wherever you go.

For Spontaneous Adventures: Field Trip
This Google-designed app uses your phone’s location services to pick up on what’s cool around you nearly anywhere in the world. (Use the app’s “Feeling Lucky” setting to minimize data-roaming charges.) Wander the streets of Bangkok, for example, and you’ll get notifications about great restaurants, shops, historic sites, and even special deals nearby—each tip pulls information from resources such as Zagat and the American Institute of Architects. Exploring by car? Set the app on “speaking” mode for a hands-free experience. Free; Android, iOS.

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4 Travel Tips from Virgin Atlantic’s Flight Attendants

 

T+L dropped in on Virgin Atlantic’s flight-attendant training and gleaned four travel pointers you can use, too.

Foods to Avoid: Onions, cauliflower, cabbage, and carbonated beverages can make you feel bloated at high altitudes.

Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate: Drink three quarts of water: one before, one during, and one after your flight. Also bring a facial spray with essential oils (plain water is drying).

Healthy Hint: Polyphenol-rich fruit juices (cranberry; pomegranate) reduce the risk of blood clots. Ditto oily fish.

Don’t Forget: The night before you check out, place your shoes with your passport and wallet in the hotel’s safe. You’ll never forget anything in the safe again!

Kathryn O'Shea-Evans
Kathryn O'Shea-Evans is an associate editor at
Travel + Leisure. Follow her on Twitter @ThePluckyOne.

 


Photo by istockphoto.com

Do I Need to Lock My Bag When I Fly?

luggage lock

Last year, 26 million bags were reported mishandled worldwide; of those, 12.9 percent were pilfered or damaged, according to global aviation consultancy SITA. It may sound like a lot, but that still comes down to just about one bag per 1,000 passengers. Want to reduce the risk? Be sure to get the right lock—only those with Travel Sentry or Safe Skies emblems are TSA-approved.

45: The percentage drop in mishandled bags worldwide from 2007 to 2012.

Amy FarleyHave a travel dilemma? Need some tips and remedies? Send your questions to news editor Amy Farley at tripdoctor@aexp.com. Follow @tltripdoctor on Twitter.


 

Photo by istockphoto.com

Travel Advisory: Warnings vs. Alerts

Travel Advisory

The U.S. Department of State (DOS) issues a Travel Warning when it identifies a chronic and sustained threat to U.S. citizens in a given country. Sometimes it warns against all travel there; sometimes it simply informs people of the risk. Travel Alerts usually address problems of finite duration, such as elections, public demonstrations, or hurricanes. The DOS also issues Security Messages and Emergency Messages, depending on the situation. To get updates for a particular trip, sign up for the DOS’s Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) at step.state.gov.

Amy FarleyHave a travel dilemma? Need some tips and remedies? Send your questions to news editor Amy Farley at tripdoctor@aexp.com. Follow @tltripdoctor on Twitter.


Photo by istockphoto.com

6 Things You Didn't Know About Your Boarding Pass

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1. The Bar Code
The International Air Transport Association mandated in 2005 that all 240 member airlines have to use boarding passes embedded with bar codes rather than magnetic strips—making it possible to print them at home and ushering in the era of paperless travel.

2. Flight Time
The practice of padding flight times to account for unpredictable tarmac traffic peaked around 2010. Airlines have since scaled back. This JFK-LAX flight went from six hours, four minutes in 2005 to six hours, 40 minutes in 2010. It’s now six hours, 15 minutes.

3. Security
The TSA’s PreCheck expedited security program continues its rapid expansion, adding new partner airlines and airports to its ranks. If you’re a member, scan your boarding pass to see if you’ve been granted PreCheck clearance for a given flight.

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How to Get a Visa Quickly

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Ever wonder how to get a visa in a hurry? When it comes to visa wrangling, I’m the kind of gal who likes to do hers nice and early. Obviously, that’s not always an option: earlier this month, I had to organize a last-minute work trip to Shanghai in three days.

It had been a while since we’ve covered passport and visa expediting agency Travisa, so I decided to give them a try (the $99 fee seemed a little steep, but I figured it was worth it—one false move on my Chinese visa application and I’d be out of luck). And thank goodness I did: when I arrived at Travisa’s New York office on a recent Wednesday, documents in hand, my case manager identified several crucial mistakes and omissions in my paperwork that would have sent me back to square one. By Friday—the day before my scheduled departure to Asia—I had my passport in my hot little hands.

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