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Sweetgreen Salad Shop Debuts in New York

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Ask a New Yorker where to get a salad in Midtown Manhattan, and you’ll likely get an answer that includes “too expensive,” “wilted lettuce,” or other unenthusiastic sentiments. As of tomorrow, however, there will be another response: Sweetgreen, a new organic, farm-to-table salad shop at the Nomad hotel.

Founded in 2007 by three then-seniors at Georgetown University, Sweetgreen became a fast favorite in Washington, D.C., and over the last six years, expanded to 20 locations in Virginia, Maryland, Philadelphia, Boston, and, now, New York. (A Tribeca location will open in December.) All of the ingredients are locally sourced; a chalkboard lists the New York or New Jersey farm where each originated. As for the prices, nothing on the signature menu costs more than $11.85 (the "District Chopped"), and that one comes with roasted chicken, goat cheese, bacon, and avocado—a who’s who of costly add-ons at most other spots. Beyond salad (which are big enough to last two meals), you’ll find fresh-pressed juice, gazpacho, and “sweetflow” tart frozen yogurt. Try it all tomorrow from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., when the Nomad location is inviting diners to pay what they want, with all proceeds going to City Harvest.

Brooke Porter
Brooke Porter is an associate editor at Travel + Leisure. Follow her on Twitter at @brookeporter1.

Photo courtesy of Brooke Porter

James Beard Awards Brought Food and Film to Lincoln Center

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Last night, the food world’s glitterati came together at New York’s Lincoln Center for the annual James Beard Awards. Food and film was this year’s theme (tagline: “Lights! Camera! Taste!”). Actor Oliver Platt hosted, guests wore 3-D glasses, and the post-award reception menu included movie-inspired bites (Nate Appleman’s take on Pulp Fiction’s Royale with Cheese was a big hit).

Here, we highlight a few of the night’s big winners—and all the things we’ve had to say about them.

Best Chef: Great Lakes
Stephanie Izard, Chicago
The Top Chef winner took home top honors for her work in Chicago. Her Girl & the Goat empire now includes Goat Market and Little Goat Diner, which we highlighted in this roundup of America’s coolest diners.

Best Chef: Mid-Atlantic
Johnny Monis, Washington, D.C.
This Virginia-born chef was just 24 when he opened the Greek-inspired Komi, featured in our definitive guide to Washington, D.C.

Best Chef: Southeast
Joseph Lenn, Walland, Tennessee
The Tennessee native creates masterful dishes using ingredients fresh from Blackberry Farm, where he is executive chef. In our April food issue, Aleksandra Crapanzano penned an ode to outdoor dining at this classic Great Smokey Mountains retreat.

Best Chef: New York City
Wylie Dufresne, Manhattan
Call him the Susan Lucci of the James Beard Awards: this kitchen wizard has finally won after 10 nominations. His famed restaurant wd-50 made our list of New York’s most adventurous restaurants.

Best New Restaurant
State Bird Provisions, San Francisco
Adam Sachs didn’t show a lot of love for this quirky spot known for its dim sum-inspired cart service—but his recent story on San Francisco dining proves the city is the place to be for new boundary-pushing restaurants.

Rising Star Chef of the Year
Danny Bowien
The blue-haired chef (pictured above) has been the talk of both coasts, now that his runaway hit Mission Chinese Food is open in San Francisco and New York. Both locations were showcased on this list of best Chinese restaurants in the U.S.

Brooke Porter
Brooke Porter is an associate editor at Travel + Leisure. Follow her on Twitter at @brookeporter1.

Photo credit: Kent Miller

On the Menu: French Chef Spices Up Sushi

Pierre Sang Boyer

Top Chef finalist, Pierre Sang Boyer, has finally settled down in the Oberkampf area of Paris after a number of pop-up restaurants. The Korean, French-raised chef offers a fixed menu at his eponymous Pierre Sang Restaurant.

Original course combinations include tempura of andoilette with tuna sashimi, roast-suckling pig with pumpkin puree, and a moelleux of chocolate with wasabi and Armagnac foam. The restaurant is first come, first serve with no reservations or telephone, so plan to beat the 1 o’clock lunch crowd for less waiting and more munching.

Maria Pedone is a digital editorial intern at Travel + Leisure.

Photo © Niki Photograph

Rome: Convenient Street Eats

Sanacafe

Choosing where to eat while abroad, even in the sure-shot restaurants across Italy, can be tough. Cafés close early and locations near landmarks are all too crowded with tourists. Luckily, we now have three new restaurants that fit the bill.

Garnering consensus in Rome is Sanacafe', a cafe and restaurant open from 8 AM to midnight, seven days a week. This airy, designer-led space sources organic and biodynamic ingredients – some of which are on sale. For breakfast, choose from blended fruit and vegetable juices, yogurt, homemade cornetti and cakes; at lunchtime there are salads, vegetarian menus and home made ice cream; in the evening, the menu features local, creative cuisine: pecorino, pear and black pepper tart; chocolate mousse with salt crystals. Centrally-located in the Prati district, check this café out on Via Pompeo Magno.

Also worth investigating in Rome is La Caffetteria di Fandango Incontro, a cafe, bar and meeting point on the second floor of the publicly owned, 18th century Palazzo Incontro, which is also home to a bookshop, cinema, exhibition space and theatre workshop. Furnished mostly in wood and white, and dotted with plants, the bar is a great place for breakfast, light lunches and aperitifs – with an intellectual air. There is also a good selection of wines.

For those knocking landmarks off their list, try Baccano, a new multi-functional restaurant close to the Trevi Fountain, serving breakfast, brunch, lunch and dinner.  Think 1950's Parisian (dark wood, mosaics, antique ceiling fans) for the atmosphere, but the menu is strictly Italian.  You'll find all the classics here – from spaghetti alla carbonara to ossobuco, A good selection of artisanal beers and wines accompany the traditional fare.

Maria Pedone is a digital editorial intern at Travel + Leisure.

Photo Courtesy of Sanacafe Italy

The Monocle Café Opens in London

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Monocle, the London-based magazine of global affairs and style, is as well known for its in-depth articles about far-flung destinations as for its clean, smart look. For both those things, it's a magazine meant to be read as much as be seen with—whether on the plane, or displayed on your (designer) coffee table. Now, the six-year-old publication wants to be known for the taste of its coffee. On April 15, The Monocle Café is set to open in London's Marylebone neighborhood, promising customers a very Monocle-like experience. (Read: posh, international, and very, very stylish.)

The Monocle Café occupies two stories at 18 Chiltern Street and was designed by the same team that created the sharp, classic look of the magazine. The Café features coffee from Allpress, a menu designed by chef Masayuki Hara, and a soundtrack provided by Monocle 24, the magazine's radio station. This being Monocle—where a little exclusivity goes a long ways—subscribers are invited to rent the space out for private parties.

Read More

Where to Eat Now in Hong Kong

Where to Eat in Hong Kong: 22 Ships

Both foodies and real estate obsessives are eyeing the emerging PoHo area of Sheung Wan, where minimalist-chic bakery Po’s Atelier ($) showcases celeb chef Masami Asano’s loaves, made with such ingredients as oolong tea and Yunnanese ham and goat cheese.

Nearby, the team responsible for yakitori spot Yardbird have opened Ronin ($$$), a seafood-focused izakaya with more than 50 Japanese whiskies and just 14 first-come, first-serve seats.

The Salted Pig ($$$) celebrates all things porcine in a convivial space in Central filled with bloggers snapping pics of sous vide pork belly.

Singaporean hotelier Yenn Wong pairs up with London’s Jason Atherton at tapas joint 22 Ships (pictured; $$$), in Wan Chai. There’s always a wait—but that means more time to ogle the beautiful people nibbling on squid paella and truffled egg with celeriac.

Restaurant Pricing Key
$ Less than $25
$$ $25 to $75
$$$ $75 to $150
$$$$ More than $150

Photo courtesy of 22 Ships

Trip Doctor: How to Get a Last-Minute Restaurant Reservation in New York City

last-minute restaurant recommendation

See if your hotel concierge can get you in. If not, you’ll have to use your wiles. At pint-size hot spots such as Atera or Blanca, your chances are slim. But established favorites, such as Daniel or Maialino, have more tables—and more cancellations. Call at or after 3 p.m., when the hosts finish reconfirming the evening’s reservations. There just might be a spot. OpenTable is also a great resource. It may not get you in to your first choice, but it will show you nearby restaurants that do have availability. If all else fails, walk in. Casual arrivals may find seats at the bar—and if you dress the part, some maître d’s will reward a bold, spontaneous request with a table.

Amy FarleyHave a travel dilemma? Need some tips and remedies? Send your questions to news editor Amy Farley at tripdoctor@aexp.com. Follow @tltripdoctor on Twitter.


Photo by Tetra Images / Alamy

Where to Eat Now in New York City

Where to Eat in New York City: Aska

Natty couples channel their grandparents in a supper-club setting at Carbone ($$$$), with upgraded Italian American classics—linguine with clams; chicken scarpariello—by the duo behind the ever-popular Torrisi.

Two big names are vying for West Villagers’ affections. Top Chef alum Harold Dieterle explores his German and Italian roots at the Marrow ($$$), while Gabriel Stulman—whose retro neighborhood joints Joseph Leonard and Fedora have a cult following—veers into new territory with the Frenchified sushi at Chez Sardine ($$$).

At Lafayette ($$), his all-day NoHo brasserie, Andrew Carmellini returns to his French training (he cooked under Daniel Boulud), serving country-style dishes to the fashion set.

Across the river in Brooklyn, the culinary intelligentsia clamor for tables at Aska (pictured; $$), a New Nordic spot in Williamsburg.

T+L Insider Video: Where to Eat in NYC

Restaurant Pricing Key
$ Less than $25
$$ $25 to $75
$$$ $75 to $150
$$$$ More than $150

Photo by Nathan Rawlinson - Courtesy of Aska

Countryside Chic: Tuscany’s New High-Profile Hotels

Hotel Monteverdi

The expansive green hills and sun-kissed vineyards of Tuscany, Italy lend an air of elegance to the countryside. Driving along such scenery is a dream in itself—but when you do arrive at your destination, plan to lay your head down in luxury at one of these high-profile hotels.

Founder Michael Cioffi opened Hotel Monteverdi, with interiors by contemporary Italian designer, Ilaria Miani, during summer 2012 in Castiglioncello del Trinoro. The village also has several newly built villas to let. Castiglioncello is located six kilometres from La Foce, biographer Iris Origo's former estate. Each year, La Foce hosts an annual classical music festival, put on by the not-for-profit cultural association, Incontri in Terra di Siena.

In another high-profile opening, a chic new 41-suite castle hotel named Castello di Casole, was recently inaugurated six miles from the quaint Etruscan village of Casole d'Elsa. Now owned by Timber Resorts, the estate was formerly the home of film director Luchino Visconi and an entertainment center for countless Hollywood luminaries. The 4,200-acre wine estate is one of the largest land holdings in Italy, and also has a farmhouse and villa rentals, plus real estate for sale. Special services include hand-made picnic basket lunches, art and ceramic classes and wildlife tours. 

Maria Pedone is a digital editorial intern at Travel + Leisure.

Photo courtesy of Hotel Castello di Casole

On the Menu: Treats and Tarts at Paris Brunch Spot

Colorova

Paris is mixing up their brunch scene with pastry shop and tearoom, Colorova in the Saint-Germain neighborhood. Eclectic, cultural pieces such as African masks contrast Colorova’s contemporary furniture. Compotes are homemade and all food is organic. To satisfy a morning sweet tooth, try a caramel, peanut, or speculoos tart. For a heavier meal to get you through the day, order a salmon and grilled eggplant sandwich or ratatouille and fresh spinach tart.

Maria Pedone is a digital editorial intern at Travel + Leisure.

Photo by Meg Gagnard

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