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Daily Transporter: Re-seeding the Great Barrier Reef

coral like jewels

When the Great Barrier Reef's coral spawned last year, scientists harvested enough sperm samples to start a cryogenically frozen coral sperm bank. They hope to use it to replenish failing reefs in the future. (Since 1985, 50% of the GBR's coral has been lost to disease, cyclones, and pollution, among other causes.)

See the Great Barrier Reef in Fastest Disappearing Natural Wonders

Editor’s Picks: Great Barrier Reef
World’s Best Islands
World’s Coolest Helicopter Rides
Great Adventure Cruises

Ann Shields is a senior digital editor at Travel + Leisure. You can find her on Twitter at @aegisnyc. Get the Daily Transporter newsletter in your in-box.

Photo courtesy of T+L Photo Contest

Daily Transporter: Elephants in China

yunnan's mountain lakes

The wild elephant population of China’s lushly forested Yunnan Province has grown to nearly 300, thanks to strict laws—poachers are subject to the death penalty—and feeding programs funded by the government. (China also compensates local farmers for sugar cane, rice, and banana crops lost to snacking pachyderms.)

See Yunnan Province in Best Life-Changing Trips

Editor’s Picks: Western China
New Wonders of the World
Newest Wonders of the World
It List: Best New Hotels

Ann Shields is a senior digital editor at Travel + Leisure. You can find her on Twitter at @aegisnyc. Get the Daily Transporter newsletter in your in-box.

Photo courtesy of T+L Photo Contest

Bagan Prohibits New Hotel Construction While Awaiting UNESCO World Heritage Status

Myanmar

Bagan, an ancient city in Myanmar with thousands of Buddhist temples and stupas dotting the landscape—and a place that I was lucky enough to visit last December—has put a halt on new hotels while the government applies for UNESCO World Heritage status.

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Daily Transporter: Rome

evening on the piazza

Antico Caffe della Pace, an Art Deco landmark off the Piazza Navona, has been the place to spot celebrities since the 19th century. (Woody Allen and Coppola, among others, have used the café as a film location.) A recent plan to close the café was quashed by a number of petitions supporting the “historic and cultural monument.”

See Rome in Celebrities’ Favorite Places

Editor’s Picks: Rome
See Rome in Best Hotels in Rome
and World’s Coolest New Tourist Attractions
and Europe’s Best Places to Eat Like a Local

Ann Shields is a senior digital editor at Travel + Leisure. Get the Daily Transporter newsletter in your in-box.

Photo courtesy of T+L Photo Contest

Preserving the Charm of Beijing's Hutongs

Hutong

In and around the Gulou district of China’s development-hungry capital, an enclave of hutongs—alleys formed by walls of traditional courtyard residences—has managed to dodge the wrecking ball. Determined to preserve the charm (and avoid the fate of hutongs in nearby Nanluoguxiang, now overrun with souvenir shops), entrepreneurs have moved deeper into these narrow streets. French-owned Wuhao showcases one-off furniture and accessories by emerging talents. At Good Design Institute, everyday objects get a twist, such as lampshades made of bed slats. Serk stocks carbon-fiber bikes—and doubles as a bar serving Belgian beer. For a more local tipple, head to Mai (40 Beiluoguxiang, Dongcheng), known for its craft cocktails.

Photo courtesy of Serk

Cinque Terre News: Flood Devastates Vernazza, Italy

Vernazza, Cinque Terre, Italy

The before/after photographs are harrowing: in the first, a postcard-perfect Italian village, with pine-green shutters and lemon and rose façades, lapped by the turquoise waters of the Mediterranean. In the next, the same village buried in a horrifying avalanche of mud, its harbor now the color and consistency of cement.

On October 25, flooding from a freak rainstorm devastated the town of Vernazza, one of the five villages that make up the celebrated Cinque Terre in Liguria . Rivers of water and mud cascaded down the steep and narrow streets, burying the town’s lowest levels in as much as 13 feet of debris, while also overwhelming the railroad tracks that provided the primary way in or out of Vernazza. (Part of the Cinque Terre’s allure is that four of its cliff-hugging villages are accessible only by train, boat, or hiking trail.)

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A Meeting of the (Green) Minds at T+L's First Global Vision Awards Luncheon

201110-b-globalvisionjpg

In our November issue, which just hit newsstands, you’ll find our seventh annual Global Vision Awards, which recognize the new leaders in responsible travel. This year, our winners included everything from Misool Eco Resort, a visionary property that’s responsible for setting up the first shark and ray sanctuary in Indonesia, to Rancho La Puerta, a luxury spa in Baja, Mexico that’s championing ecological restoration and education in the local community. In their own unique ways, these progressive thinkers represent the travel community’s best, most innovative solutions to some of the world’s most vexing problems: climate change, environmental degradation, cultural erosion, and economic inequality.

Last Friday, we invited our jurors and winners to New York City for our first-ever Global Vision Awards luncheon and round-table discussion, which took place at The Lambs Club in midtown’s Chatwal Hotel. Read on to see how the conversation unfolded.

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Papua New Guinea Tribesmen Spotted on Times Square

Wigman in NYC

I was one of the lucky New Yorkers who caught a brief, colorful glimpse of Papua New Guinea recently.  At an event sponsored by luxury tour operator Absolute Travel and the Papua New Guinea Tourism Promotion Authority, two tribesmen—a Wigman from the Huli tribe and a Mudman from the Asaro tribe—performed and mingled with the crowd to promote travel to PNG.  The promotion worked.  I want to go.

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Hammer and Claws Blue Crab Feast Debuts in NYC

201109-b-crab-2jpg

Summer might technically end on September 21, but a few goodfolks are letting New Yorkers prolong the spirit: from September 23–25, the Hammer and Claws Blue Crab Feast will hit Chelsea for the first time, bringing an authentic, Maryland-style (steamed in beer, vinegar, and water, and dusted with Old Bay seasoning), all-you-can-eat blue crab feast right up to the Hudson Harbor. Tickets for each of the weekend’s four seatings cost $118, and include all the fixings—plus beer and cocktails. And it’s all for a good cause, no less.

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Yosemite to Cut Down Trees to Preserve Views

 

Yosemite falls

This fall, after many of the 3.7 million annual tourists have packed their cameras and left Yosemite National Park, the National Parks Service will begin culling young trees to open up views of the iconic granite faces and dramatic waterfalls that ring the valley.

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